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Archive for the ‘Trust Research’ Category

Jan
30

 

Did you know that we co-manage and host one of the largest publicly available organizational trust bibliographies? Our 2016 bibliography is currently being updated. Do you have an entry that might qualify for inclusion? Our current bibliography can be accessed at this link: trustacrossamerica.com/trust-bibliography.shtml

To be considered, please send your entries to barbara@trustacrossamerica.com no later than February 15, 2017.

 

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the CEO and Cofounder of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. Now in its eighth year, the program’s proprietary FACTS® Framework ranks and measures the trustworthiness of over 1500 US public companies on five quantitative indicators of trust. Barbara also runs the world’s largest global Trust Alliance, is the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and a Managing Member at FACTS® Asset Management, a NJ registered investment advisor. In 2012 she was named one of “25 Women who are Changing the World” by Good Business International. Barbara holds a BA in International Affairs and an MBA.

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Dec
04

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Measuring the integrity or trustworthiness of public companies is an ongoing research project at  Trust Across America-Trust Around the World. In fact, we now have over 7 years of increasingly “rich” data.

Take a look at this chart:

 

 

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While we are in the business of identifying “best in breed” and not in predicting the next corporate crisis, our FACTS(R) proprietary data is quite capable of doing so. Citigroup, JP Morgan, Bank of America, Wells Fargo… Did the lack of integrity at Wells Fargo contribute to its recent crisis? Could it have been avoided under different leadership? What do you think?

Would you like more insights like this?

Request our White Paper:  The State of Trust in Corporate America 2016

Trust Data: Public companies can review the level of trust within their organization and compare their performance to their peers.

Order our Trust Inc. book series.

2017 Trust Poster: Weekly Do’s and Don’ts to Foster Organizational Trust

Join our Trust Alliance where share our research with high integrity business leaders.

If you lead an organization, serve on a Board or in any management capacity or work with others, and you continue to ignore trust as a hard asset, you are losing out to your competitors and failing to protect your organization against a Wells Fargo crisis.

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the CEO and Cofounder of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. Now in its seventh year, the program’s proprietary FACTS® Framework ranks and measures the trustworthiness of over 2,000 U.S. public companies on five quantitative indicators of trust. Barbara is also the editor of the award-winning TRUST INC. book series and a Managing Member at FACTS® Asset Management, a New Jersey registered investment advisor.

 

Copyright (c)  2016, Next Decade, Inc.

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Oct
27

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What do low integrity and trust cost an organization and the economy? The research studies cited below should give our readers some insight:

  • Gallup reports that employee engagement was more or less stagnant in 2015, (over 17% actively disengaged.) In 2014 less than one-third of US workers were engaged in their jobs, with millenials the least engaged, and this is costing the US economy $450-550 billion a year, which is over 15% of payroll costs. (Gallup, 2015)
  • The Association of Certified Fraud Examiner’s survey participants estimated that the typical organization loses 5% of its revenues to fraud each year. Applied to the 2011 Gross World Product, this figure translates to a potential projected annual fraud loss of more than $3.5 trillion. 2012 Global Fraud Study
  • According to The Economist Intelligence Unit (2010), 84% of senior leaders say disengaged employees are considered one of the biggest threats facing their business. However, only 12% of them reported doing anything about this problem.
  • The cost of Federal Regulations is approaching $2 trillion annually according to a study by the Competitive Enterprise Institute.
  • According to a recent report by PwC the U.S. held its position as the top location for innovation, with in-country R&D spending of $145 billion in 2015. However, other countries (i.e., China) increased their R&D spending by greater proportions than the U.S. which caused it to lose some of its relative advantage.
  • Volkswagen lost 20% of its stock value after the emissions scandal and Target’s profits fell 34.3% after it’s data breach.
  • A study by Murphy, Shrieves and Tibbs called “Determinants of the Stock Price Reaction to Allegations of Corporate Misconduct” finds that allegations of misconduct are accompanied by statistically significant control-firm adjusted declines in reported earnings, increases in stock return variability, and a decline in concordance among analysts’ earnings estimates.”
  • In a 2008 study by Karpoff, Lee and Martin called “The Cost to Firm’s of Cooking the Books,” the authors find The penalties imposed on firms through the legal system average only $23.5 million per firm. The penalties imposed by the market, in contrast, are huge.
  • The PR firm Edelman finds in their 2016 “Trust Barometer” that nearly one in three employees don’t trust their employer. And more than two thirds feel that CEOs are too focused on short-term performance. As a result, employees are far less likely to say positive things about the company they work for.

The trust gap not only negatively impacts a company’s revenue, market share, brand reputation, employee engagement and turnover, stock price, and bottom line profitability, but every facet of society.

What happens when integrity & trust increase?

Find out in our new white paper: The State of Trust in Corporate America 2016. Request it here.

Copyright (c) 2016 Next Decade, Inc.

 

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Oct
16

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Executive Summary of White Paper Recently Published

by Trust Across America-Trust Around the World

 

Building a trustworthy company will improve both its profitability and organizational sustainability. Supporting this statement is a growing body of evidence showing an increasing correlation between trustworthiness and superior financial performance. Our 2016 report attempts to provide content and context to place trust in the center of more business conversations, to answer the following questions and dispel the myth that integrity and trust are “soft” skills.

  • Why do trust and integrity matter?
  • Can they be measured?
  • Are they profitable?
  • Which sectors are the most trustworthy?
  • Is industry destiny?
  • What are the costs of low trust and integrity and why do they matter as hard currencies?
  • Which companies are some of the most trustworthy and why?
  • How can companies become more trustworthy?

Integrity and trust should start at the top and flow down through the organization. They are not CSR, compliance, HR or leadership “programs” but rather an intentional holistic business strategy adopted by leadership and practiced daily. Vanishing are the days of low transparency, “short termism” and maximization of shareholder value at the expense of other stakeholders.

As trust breaches continue to make the headlines across many major institutions and societies around the globe, organizations that choose integrity and trust as intentional strategies will continue to outperform their peers.

Who will find value in reading this paper?

  • Business leaders
  • Boards of Directors
  • Associations
  • Investors
  • Communications and Investor Relations
  • Corporate responsibility officers
  • Regulators
  • Politicians
  • NGOs

Please register here to request access to the full paper.

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the CEO and Cofounder of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. Now in its seventh year, the program’s proprietary FACTS® Framework ranks and measures the trustworthiness of over 1500 US public companies on five quantitative indicators of trust. Barbara also runs the world largest global Trust Alliance, is the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and a Managing Member at FACTS® Asset Management, a NJ registered investment advisor.

Copyright © 2016, Next Decade, Inc.

 

Print

trustacrossamerica.com/order.shtml

 

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Sep
22

 

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If your work brings you in contact with others, and chances are it does, how much time do you, your team or your leaders spend discussing how your internal and external stakeholders perceive the company’s integrity? How much time is allocated to reinforcing the notion that strong corporate culture built on trust and integrity are business imperatives? If your answer is “little to none” you are not alone. As a former CEO told me, most leaders are too busy putting out the day-to-day fires to think much about “soft skills” like integrity. One need only refer to the latest Wells Fargo and Mylan scandals to see what happens when culture, trust & integrity are of little importance to corporate leadership. Ironically, many of these same crises could be averted if the “soft skills” were a business imperative.Why does organizational integrity matter? Can, and should it be measured?

Why do organizational trust and integrity matter?

When the culture and core values of an organization are not only strong but also reinforced daily, and leaders keep their word, the following occurs:

  • Employees are more engaged and turnover decreases
  • Innovation increases
  • Decisions are made faster
  • The reputation “bank account” grows
  • Crises diminish
  • Profits are higher

According to a 2011 Booz & Co. study, “The Global Innovation 1000: Why Culture is Key,” companies with both highly aligned cultures and highly aligned innovation strategies have 30 percent higher enterprise value growth and 17 percent higher profit growth than companies with low degrees of alignment.

A 2013 study by Guiso, Sapienza and Zingales called “The Value of Corporate Culture” finds that proclaimed values appear irrelevant. Yet, when employees perceive top managers as trustworthy and ethical, firm’s performance is stronger.

And in the absence of strong core values…

  • Volkswagen lost 20% of its stock value after the emissions scandal and Target’s profits fell 34.3% after it’s data breach.
  • A study by Murphy, Shrieves and Tibbs called “Determinants of the Stock Price Reaction to Allegations of Corporate Misconduct” finds that allegations of misconduct are accompanied by statistically significant control-firm adjusted declines in reported earnings, increases in stock return variability, and a decline in concordance among analysts’ earnings estimates.”
  • In a 2008 study by Karpoff, Lee and Martin called “The Cost to Firm’s of Cooking the Books,” the authors find The penalties imposed on firms through the legal system average only $23.5 million per firm. The penalties imposed by the market, in contrast, are huge.

Can, and should culture, integrity & trust be measured?

Jose Tabuena recently wrote an article for Compliance Week called “To Really Improve Corporate Culture it must be Measurable.” It’s worth a read. The essence of the article is that “good measurement informs uncertain decision-making. And if you measure what matters, you make better decisions.” While corporate culture, core-values, good citizenship, ethics, integrity and trust are commonly believed to be immeasurable intangibles or soft skills, evidence like that provided above point to the fact that these are not only false beliefs, but also that the benefits of ethical cultures far outweigh the costs. Yet most leaders continue to hold fast to the “soft skills” argument because neither they nor their Boards of Directors are thinking about them, being provided with the “right” data and/or because systemic change is:

  1. Hard work
  2. Takes time and
  3. Requires an “all hands on” approach.

Much of our work at Trust Across America-Trust Around the World focuses on measuring the integrity or trust “worthiness” of pubic companies and identifying “best in breed” via a unique, holistic lens called the FACTS® Framework.

Developed by a cross-silo multidisciplinary team, and in the wake of the financial crisis in 2008, the framework began to take shape by asking the same question of dozens of “siloized” professionals from leadership, compliance and ethics, legal, accounting, finance, HR, consulting, CSR, sustainability, etc. “What do you consider an indicator of corporate integrity or trust “worthiness” that can be independently and quantitatively measured without requiring the input of the organization itself? And while every professional had a different perspective, the same indicators were mentioned time and again. “In order for a company to be trust “worthy” it must display good corporate governance said the governance folks.” Similarly the financial professionals pointed to stable earnings, the accounting group talked about forensics, and so on. And by blending all of these indicators of corporate trustworthiness into a very large integrity spreadsheet, we found ourselves able to measure integrity and trustworthiness with some degree of accuracy. The master spreadsheet also makes glaringly apparent where and why the Enron-like “risk” often lays hidden in these 1500+ public companies.

Fast forward, and with eight years of unique and compelling data, the majority of companies and their leaders continue to hold on to the notion that trust is a soft and immeasurable skill, and that data from one corporate silo to the next need not be viewed as a holistic “whole body” scan. After all, it’s very hard to balance long-term value creation against the need to “maximize earnings” and meet the always-looming quarterly numbers. Better to wait until the next corporate crisis to talk about the importance of trust and how measures will be implemented (maybe) to safeguard against future missteps. Or maybe it’s time to start thinking more carefully about integrity & trust.

According to our FACTS® Framework, during the three-year period from February 2013-February 2016 America’s most trustworthy public companies substantially outperformed the S&P 500 according to the actual composite audited performance shown below and reprinted with permission of Facts Asset Management, LLC.

FACTS SP 500 Returns

This was not a “back test” but rather “live” money under management, followed by an independent audit verifying the returns. Trust works as a business strategy.

FACTS® Managed Accounts were independently audited from Feb.1, 2013-Jan.31, 2016. Prepared by FACTS Asset Management LLC. FACTS® is our model of identifying America’s Most Trustworthy Companies by applying FACTS strategy parameters. The composite results translate to 50.09% for FACTS® and 28.1% for the S&P 500 cumulative percentage return shown above, or 16.7% average annualized for FACTS® vs. 9.5% for the S&P 500 over the same period.  The audited Composite Performance results shown above may not be indicative of future results.  Full audit documents available upon request.

The composite performance records are based on all accounts managed using the FACTS strategy for a three year period, 2/1/13 to 1/31/16 and are not representative of the FACTS® Asset Management LLC program. Tax consequences are not reflected in the performance records.  Past performance is not an indication of future return.  There can be no guarantee that a new program will prove to be profitable in the future or that it will achieve performance results similar to those achieved in the past using the FACTS strategy parameters and you may lose money.  The performance numbers reflect the reinvestment of dividends.  The composite performance net of fees is calculated using a weighted average fee for the entire period because not all accounts were charged equal fees and some accounts were not charged fees. The S&P 500 is a widely recognized market value-weighted index of 500 stocks designed to mimic the overall U.S. equity market’s industry weightings, and does reflect the reinvestment of dividends. Past results are not necessarily indicative of future results.

FACTS® Asset Management LLC is a New Jersey registered Registered Investment Advisor. Prepared by FACTS Asset Management LLC

 

While no company is perfect, a growing group of visionary leaders have struck that balance and are reaping the rewards shown in the chart above. Over the years our FACTS® Framework has identified many high integrity companies who share above average scores across all measurable indicators of trust “worthiness” and a leadership vision that embraces the new strategic business imperative of elevating integrity & trust.

Leaders that measure what matters, including trust, DO make better decisions and over time they are rewarded with lower risk and higher profitability.

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the CEO and Cofounder of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. Now in its seventh year, the program’s proprietary FACTS® Framework ranks and measures the trustworthiness of over 1500 US public companies on five quantitative indicators of trust. Barbara also runs the world largest global Trust Alliance, is the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and a Managing Member at FACTS® Asset Management, a NJ registered investment advisor.

 

Copyright © 2016, Next Decade, Inc.

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Sep
13

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Leaders and their organizations must earn trust before they can build it.

Failure to earn trust leaves the enterprise vulnerable to countless risks. —

Barbara Brooks Kimmel

Trust building can be implemented through the following sequence of actions and initiatives. We call this the VIP Trust Model.

 Triangle

 

  • VISION & VALUES: Leaders identify, with input from all stakeholders, the organization’s principles or core values. Why does the organization exist and what does it stand for? Write a meaningful credo with buy-in from all silos.
  • INTEGRITY: Practice and regularly communicate the moral principles and purpose of the leadership team and the organization. Hold training for employees in leading with trust in their behaviors and interactions. Lose the “sales scripts.”
  • PROMISES & PROCESS: Ensure that leadership is held accountable for doing what they say they will do, and for regularly communicating the vision, values and promises to all stakeholders. Make this a daily function of your corporate responsibility team in collaboration with compliance and communications.

Implement ways of doing things that translate the principles above into organized group behavior. Internally this includes the hiring and training of employees, structure of meetings, transparency of/fair personnel policies, how decisions are made and accessibility to leadership. With external stakeholders (vendors, customers, community, etc.), trust can be enhanced using quantitative measurement, benchmark and screening “tools” like Trust Across America’s FACTS® Framework.

About the Author:

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the CEO and Cofounder of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. Now in its seventh year, the program’s proprietary FACTS® Framework ranks and measures the trustworthiness of over 2,000 U.S. public companies on five quantitative indicators of trust. Barbara is also the editor of the award-winning TRUST INC. book series and a Managing Member at FACTS® Asset Management, a New Jersey registered investment advisor.

Nominations are now open for the 7th annual Top Thought Leaders in Trust.

Copyright (c)  2016, Next Decade, Inc.

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Aug
01

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It’s Week #31 of 2016. This latest article is part of a series drawn from our 3rd annual 2016 Trust Poster….now hanging in hundreds of offices around the world. Get yours today!

52 Ideas That You Can Implement to Build Trust

Nan Russell offers this week’s advice. Nan is both a Trust Across America Top Thought Leader in Trust and a member of our Trust Alliance.

Treat people as the talented, creative, resourceful, and innovative adults they are. 

Beliefs affect actions. Do you believe most people are talented and resourceful, or most people aren’t? Most are trustworthy or most aren’t? When we act in accordance with our expectations, we enable those expectations. It’s called the Pygmalion Effect. The connection between what we expect and what we get is well documented. Behavioral scientists at the University of Zurich have confirmed experimentally that “if you trust people, you make them more trustworthy.” And, conversely, “sanctions designed to deter people from cheating actually make them cheat.”  Yet many leaders don’t realize that withholding trust reduces the exact behaviors they want and need. When you treat people as the talented, creative, resourceful, and innovative adults they are, you’re likely to get the great results you seek, plus the added dividends of increased trust and engagement.

Will you choose to take this valuable advice to your organization this week? If not, ask yourself “why not?”

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the CEO and Cofounder of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. Now in its seventh year, the program’s proprietary FACTS® Framework ranks and measures the trustworthiness of over 2000 US public companies on five quantitative indicators of trustworthy business behavior. Barbara is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and the Executive Editor of TRUST! Magazine.

Copyright 2016, Next Decade, Inc.

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Jun
06

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It’s Week #24 of 2016. This latest article is part of a series drawn from our 3rd annual 2016 Trust Poster….now hanging in hundreds of offices around the world. Get yours today!

52 Ideas That You Can Implement to Build Trust

As the CEO and Cofounder of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World, I offer this week’s idea:

When trust is made a business imperative, leadership must “own” it.

Ask almost any employee from the ground floor to the C-Suite who “owns” trust in the organization and don’t be surprised at the blank stares coming back your way. The truth is, “trust” is an orphan child simply because most leaders suffer from two false assumptions:

  • Trust is a soft skill.
  • Trust can’t be measured or tied to profitability. 

But our own FACTS(R)  Framework research paints a very different picture. Trust is NOT soft and it CAN be measured. During the three-year period from February 2013-February 2016 America’s most trustworthy public companies outperformed the S&P 500 by 1.8x. The composite results translate to 16.7% annualized for FACTS® vs. 9.5% for the S&P 500.

This was not a “test” but rather actual money under management, followed by an independent audit verifying the returns.

 

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When leaders embrace trust as an intentional business strategy it translates into a hard asset and profits soar. Building organizational trust is a top down strategy and almost always involves a period of culture change. If the leader doesn’t recognize the need for change, own it and budget for it, it will never happen. The most progressive leaders are out of the “trust” gate and ahead of their peers.

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the CEO and Cofounder of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. Now in its seventh year, the program’s proprietary FACTS® Framework ranks and measures the trustworthiness of over 2000 US public companies on five quantitative indicators of trustworthy business behavior. Barbara is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and the Executive Editor of TRUST! Magazine.

Copyright 2016, Next Decade, Inc.

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Apr
27

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I am happy to share our 2016 Trust Bibliography update curated by Bob Easton, an Accenture partner and long time friend of Trust Across America. Now at 84 pages, it is perhaps the largest living bibliography of its kind, and a tremendous asset to those who acknowledge trust as an intentional business strategy and competitive advantage.

Thank you Bob for your commitment.

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the CEO and Cofounder of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. Now in its seventh year, the program’s proprietary FACTS® Framework ranks and measures the trustworthiness of over 2000 US public companies on five quantitative indicators of trustworthy business behavior. Barbara is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and the Executive Editor of TRUST! Magazine.

Copyright 2016, Next Decade, Inc.

 

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Mar
04

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The media’s coverage of trust is gaining momentum — but the headlines are still fuzzy. It’s not hard to find examples that talk about trust as an adjective, verb, and noun, but that all fail to frame or define for readers what the word “trust” really means.

Consider the following headlines from just a couple of days in February:

When Chicagoans Don’t Trust Police, the City Suffers, Chicago Tribune, February 3, 2016

Do You Trust Taco Bell Enough to Blindly Pre-Order a Mystery Item From Them? Probably Not. Paste Magazine, February 3, 2016

In Flint water crisis, the biggest problem to fix may be trust, Christian Science Monitor, February 1, 2016

Are Chicago’s police officers untrustworthy, or is it just that Chicago’s citizenry are scared — or both? Do you trust Taco Bell to use high quality ingredients enough to order a “mystery item?” With which stakeholders is Flint attempting to fix trust?

So what EXACTLY do we mean when we talk about trust?

Read more in this article published yesterday on the FCPA Blog.