Sep
02

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

 

Late last year Trust Across America-Trust Around the World  published the first in a planned series of award-winning books.  TRUST INC., Strategies for Building Your Company’s Most Valuable Asset brings together the wisdom of 32 experts. Six months later we released our second book, Trust Inc. A Guide for Boards & C-SuitesIn this book, sixty experts have joined forces to offer 100 strategies.

Throughout the month of August, we featured 31 essays from our second book. Each stands alone as an excellent resource in guiding Boards and C-Suites on driving a trust agenda at the highest level in the organization, and provides tools for those who choose to implement trust-building programs in their organization.

There is a wealth of valuable information and resources in these essays. We hope you take a few minutes to read through them and pass them along to others.

August 1: David Shore: There’s a Reason Why We Call Them Trustees explains why being an “absentee landlord” doesn’t work.

August 2: Robert Galford: Kill the Evening Before Dinner and take a small group of front line employees to dinner instead.

August 3: Par Larshans:  In Head of Business- Hope for the World we introduce the Winston “V” Model.

August 4: James Lukaszewski:  Reputation vs. Trust and why leaders should care more about the latter.

August 5: Bernie Nagle: C-Suite Must Speak With a V.O.I.C.E. of Trust, a new communications model.

August 6: Alan Williams:  It Ain’t What You Do (It’s the Way You Do It) discusses an organization’s core values and traits.

August 7: Carol Anderson: Superficial CEOs and Their Boards talks about the fiduciary responsibility of board members.

August 8: Davis Young: Headline: Be the Leaders Others Will Follow we learn about consistency between actions and words.

August 9: David Grayson: Towards a Mindset for Corporate Responsibility requiring a shift in mindset on the part of boards.

August 10: Lilach Felner: Warning: Don’t Drown in the Slogan Swamp explores the (mis)use of slogans in corporate America.

August 11: Taina Savolainen: Trust in the Boardroom in creating competitive advantage.

August 12: Linda Locke: Three Ways to Build Trust  and organization that are blind to the dialogue.

August 13: Joe Anderson: Lead from the Front explains why it’s important to remove the filters between leaders and employees.

August 14: Roger Mayer: Building Trust For Boards & C-Suites and why published scientific evidence is important.

August 15: Lea Brovedani:  (Trust) Communication & the Hiring Process discusses engaging employees in the decision.

August 16: Bob Vanourek: CEO Tip: Trust Your Board as Your Ally emphasizes the importance of trusting partnerships.

August 17: Ellen Hunt:  The Culture is the Secret Sauce that must bubble down from the Boardroom to the Mailroom.

August 18: Carol Sanford:  Trust & Strategy Thinking reminds us that it is hard to trust when you cannot relate.

August 19: Linda Fisher Thornton:  Be Proactive About Trust & Integrity: just handling problems as they arise is not enough.

August 20: Peter DeMarco: Trust Traps reminds us to ask the tough questions.

August 21: Bob Whipple: Trust Danger Signs and the need for synergy between the Board and Senior Managers.

August 22: Doug Turner: Trust & Public Rewards reminds us to publicly acknowledge and reward staff.

August 23: David Horsager: The Cost of Mistrust and 8 ways to develop it.

August 24: Tom McCoy:  Forward-Thinking Boards Build Trust will commit to lighthouse leadership.

August 25: Dennis Reina: When Trust Breaks Down: 5 Steps You Can Take to rebuild it.

August 26: Edward Marshall: The Key To Trust in the C-Suite is safety, but how do we create it?

August 27: Jesse Lyn Stoner: Lead With Integrity & Character reminds us to start with integrity.

August 28: Matthew Fritz: Trust is Built Upon Shadows and you can cast your shadow and light over your team.

August 29: Davia Temin:  Boards in Crisis- Where Trust is Forged & Broken provides advice for managing crises proactively.

August 30: Charles H. Green: Leading for Trust: Let’s Get Real tells us to forget incentives, metrics and recognition programs.

August 31: Barbara Brooks Kimmel: Trust in Crisis: The Leader’s Formula provides a clear path to restoring trust.

PrintND Trust CEO cvr 140602-ft

Should you wish to communicate directly with Barbara, drop her a note at Barbara@trustacrossamerica.com

Copyright © 2014, Next Decade, Inc.

Sep
01

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

 

 

September is “Thoughtful Conversation” Month

 

according to Trust Across America’s

 

2014 Calendar

Your stakeholders need not know the company’s trade secrets, or what the CEO had for dinner, but if your company is serious about increasing trustworthiness, consider engaging all your stakeholders in rich, thoughtful conversations. View them as vital contributors to a better organization.

 

During the  52 weeks of 2014 you can build trust in your organization by thinking about, discussing and following the advice of the experts. Below are weekly reflections on trust for September 2014.

 

  • Week 1: Cooperation is the central mode of working, and mutual trust and true sustainability are our measures of success. Philip Mirvis, Organizational Psychologist
  • Week 2: The capacity of brands to build trust among stakeholders depends on a company’s ability to build an army of advocates. Brian Moriarty, Business Roundtable Institute for Corporate Ethics
  • Week 3: The level of organizational trust has a direct correlation with the top leader’s sincerity of purpose and values. Rajeev Peshawaria, The Iclif Leadership & Governance Centre, Malaysia
  • Week 4: The crisis of trust is a crisis of leadership Robert Phillips, Jericho Chambers
  • Week 5: We should always be moving to create high trust environments. Steven N. Pyser, JD, Temple University

Please share your comments and suggestions! Email: barbara@trustacrossamerica.com

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the Executive Director of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. She is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

PrintND Trust CEO cvr 140602-ft

Copyright © 2014, Next Decade, Inc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aug
31

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

 

Late last year Trust Across America-Trust Around the World  published the first in a planned series of award-winning books.  TRUST INC., Strategies for Building Your Company’s Most Valuable Asset brings together the wisdom of 32 experts. Six months later we released our second book, Trust Inc. A Guide for Boards & C-SuitesIn this book, sixty experts have joined forces to offer 100 strategies.

Throughout the month of August, we will be featuring 31 essays from our second book. Each stands alone as an excellent resource in guiding Boards and C-Suites on driving a trust agenda at the highest level in the organization, and provides tools for those who choose to implement trust-building programs in their organization.

This final essay wraps up our series with a short piece that I wrote for this book.  For those interested in a brief bio, I am the  Co-founder and Executive Director of Trust Across America –Trust Around the World and editor of  the Trust Inc. series of books.  In 2012 I was named one of “25 Women who are Changing the World” by Good Business International. In a previous life, I worked as a consultant to McKinsey & Company, and for the past 20 years, I have owned an award-winning communications firm in the NY Metro area called Next Decade, Inc. I majored in International Affairs at Lafayette College and have an MBA from Baruch at the City University of New York. My proudest accomplishment is having raised two children with extraordinary character and values, who like many of their friends and classmates, represent hope for the next generation of business leaders.

Trust in Crisis: The Leader’s Formula

Crisis management has become a complex field, and for good reason. There is no shortage of them in communities, businesses and the government.   But those who choose to proactively lead with trust will find any reputation blow to be softer and speedier, and the recovery much easier.

First, let’s look at the central attributes of a crisis:

  • It has the potential to do significant reputational damage
  • It has the potential to hurt at least one group of stakeholders- consumers, shareholders, employees, community, etc.
  • It is unique and often unpredictable (although not always)
  • It is of interest to the media

Now let’s look at the 5 essential SHORT-TERM measures leaders must take as the crisis unfolds:

  1. In the first 24 hours communicate widely and communicate consistently
  2. Tell the truth
  3. Tell it accurately
  4. Tell it fully
  5. Tell it yourself

And the 5 essential LONG-TERM measures for those choosing to lead with trust:

  1. Accept responsibility
  2. Take long-term corrective action, not a short term band aid
  3. Address any systemic problems
  4. Rebuild broken bridges
  5. Continue to communicate openly

It’s not rocket science, but the missing ingredient is ALWAYS trust, and that’s what keeps the crisis consultants and specialists in business.

The “business case for trusthas been made. While cultural shifts take time, those who lead with trust will be rewarded with a long-term competitive edge, and an easier recovery when the next crisis happens.

This essay concludes our August series. I hope you have enjoyed this sneak peak into our second book. There are many more suggestions and advice in our TRUST INC. book series. If this brief look behind the door has been helpful, follow this link to order both of our books online.

And for those who want to catch up on earlier essays in the series, here’s what’s been covered this month:

August 1: There’s a Reason Why We Call Them Trustees explains why being an “absentee landlord” doesn’t work.

August 2: Kill the Evening Before Dinner and take a small group of front line employees to dinner instead.

August 3: In Head of Business- Hope for the World we introduce the Winston “V” Model.

August 4: Reputation vs. Trust and why leaders should care more about the latter.

August 5: C-Suite Must Speak With a V.O.I.C.E. of Trust, a new communications model.

August 6: It Ain’t What You Do (It’s the Way You Do It) discusses an organization’s core values and traits.

August 7: Superficial CEOs and Their Boards talks about the fiduciary responsibility of board members.

August 8: Headline: Be the Leaders Others Will Follow we learn about consistency between actions and words.

August 9: Towards a Mindset for Corporate Responsibility requiring a shift in mindset on the part of boards.

August 10: Warning: Don’t Drown in the Slogan Swamp explores the (mis)use of slogans in corporate America.

August 11: Trust in the Boardroom in creating competitive advantage.

August 12: Three Ways to Build Trust  and organization that are blind to the dialogue.

August 13: Lead from the Front explains why it’s important to remove the filters between leaders and employees.

August 14: Building Trust For Boards & C-Suites and why published scientific evidence is important.

August 15: (Trust) Communication & the Hiring Process discusses engaging employees in the decision.

August 16: CEO Tip: Trust Your Board as Your Ally emphasizes the importance of trusting partnerships.

August 17: The Culture is the Secret Sauce that must bubble down from the Boardroom to the Mailroom.

August 18: Trust & Strategy Thinking reminds us that it is hard to trust when you cannot relate.

August 19: Be Proactive About Trust & Integrity: just handling problems as they arise is not enough.

August 20: Trust Traps reminds us to ask the tough questions.

August 21: Trust Danger Signs and the need for synergy between the Board and Senior Managers.

August 22: Trust & Public Rewards reminds us to publicly acknowledge and reward staff.

August 23: The Cost of Mistrust and 8 ways to develop it.

August 24: Forward-Thinking Boards Build Trust and will commit to lighthouse leadership and employee engagement.

August 25: When Trust Breaks Down: 5 Steps You Can Take to rebuild it.

August 26: The Key To Trust in the C-Suite is safety, but how do we create it?

August 27: Lead With Integrity & Character reminds us to start with integrity.

August 28: Trust is Built Upon Shadows and you can cast your shadow and light over your team.

August 29: Boards in Crisis- Where Trust is Forged & Broken provides advice for managing crises proactively.

August 30: Leading for Trust: Let’s Get Real tells us to forget incentives, metrics and recognition programs.

PrintND Trust CEO cvr 140602-ft

Should you wish to communicate directly with Barbara, drop her a note at Barbara@trustacrossamerica.com

Copyright © 2014, Next Decade, Inc.

Aug
30

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

 

Late last year Trust Across America-Trust Around the World  published the first in a planned series of award-winning books.  TRUST INC., Strategies for Building Your Company’s Most Valuable Asset brings together the wisdom of 32 experts. Six months later we released our second book, Trust Inc. A Guide for Boards & C-SuitesIn this book, sixty experts have joined forces to offer 100 strategies.

Throughout the month of August, we will be featuring 31 essays from our second book. Each stands alone as an excellent resource in guiding Boards and C-Suites on driving a trust agenda at the highest level in the organization, and provides tools for those who choose to implement trust-building programs in their organization.

This thirtieth essay brings advice from Charles H. Green, an author, speaker and world expert on trust-based relationships and sales in complex businesses. Founder and CEO of Trusted Advisor Associateshe is co-author of the classic The Trusted Advisor and its practical follow-up, The Trusted Advisor Fieldbookand author of Trust-based SellingCharles works with complex organizations to improve trust in sales, internal trust between organizations, and trusted advisor relationships with external clients and customers. He is also a 2014 Top Thought Leader in Trustworthy Business , a member of the Alliance of Trustworthy Business Experts , and serves on Trust Across America’s Steering Committee.

Leading for Trust: Let’s Get Real

Forget incentives, metrics and recognition programs. This is trust you’re talking about – you don’t get there by sprinkling cheese to encourage mice to get through a maze, or by checking boxes for legal compliance.

There is only one thing that will build trust into your organization’s DNA, and there are four steps to get you there. That thing is values based leadership. The steps are:

  1. Articulate precisely the several trust-related values you will insist on
  2. Connect frequently the values to specific instances where they should be applied
  3. Role-model yourself those values wherever possible
  4. Sanction or fire those who violate the values of the organization.

Why is values-based leadership so critical to establishing organizational trust? Because trust itself is a value. We don’t trust those who just mechanically execute behaviors. We don’t trust those who just see trust as a hook to make money. And we don’t trust those who are motivated by extrinsic rewards.

We trust those who are personally trustworthy, and who have the courage and the judgment to trust us in turn. We trust those for whom trust is a value, not a means to an end. And paradoxically, those people end up achieving more ends anyway.

 

I hope you have enjoyed this next sneak peak into our second book. If this brief look behind the door has been helpful, follow this link to order both of our books online.

And for those who want to catch up on the series, a quick reference on what’s been covered so far this month:

August 1: There’s a Reason Why We Call Them Trustees explains why being an “absentee landlord” doesn’t work.

August 2: Kill the Evening Before Dinner and take a small group of front line employees to dinner instead.

August 3: In Head of Business- Hope for the World we introduce the Winston “V” Model.

August 4: Reputation vs. Trust and why leaders should care more about the latter.

August 5: C-Suite Must Speak With a V.O.I.C.E. of Trust, a new communications model.

August 6: It Ain’t What You Do (It’s the Way You Do It) discusses an organization’s core values and traits.

August 7: Superficial CEOs and Their Boards talks about the fiduciary responsibility of board members.

August 8: Headline: Be the Leaders Others Will Follow we learn about consistency between actions and words.

August 9: Towards a Mindset for Corporate Responsibility requiring a shift in mindset on the part of boards.

August 10: Warning: Don’t Drown in the Slogan Swamp explores the (mis)use of slogans in corporate America.

August 11: Trust in the Boardroom in creating competitive advantage.

August 12: Three Ways to Build Trust  and organization that are blind to the dialogue.

August 13: Lead from the Front explains why it’s important to remove the filters between leaders and employees.

August 14: Building Trust For Boards & C-Suites and why published scientific evidence is important.

August 15: (Trust) Communication & the Hiring Process discusses engaging employees in the decision.

August 16: CEO Tip: Trust Your Board as Your Ally emphasizes the importance of trusting partnerships.

August 17: The Culture is the Secret Sauce that must bubble down from the Boardroom to the Mailroom.

August 18: Trust & Strategy Thinking reminds us that it is hard to trust when you cannot relate.

August 19: Be Proactive About Trust & Integrity: just handling problems as they arise is not enough.

August 20: Trust Traps reminds us to ask the tough questions.

August 21: Trust Danger Signs and the need for synergy between the Board and Senior Managers.

August 22: Trust & Public Rewards reminds us to publicly acknowledge and reward staff.

August 23: The Cost of Mistrust and 8 ways to develop it.

August 24: Forward-Thinking Boards Build Trust and will commit to lighthouse leadership and employee engagement.

August 25: When Trust Breaks Down: 5 Steps You Can Take to rebuild it.

August 26: The Key To Trust in the C-Suite is safety, but how do we create it?

August 27: Lead With Integrity & Character reminds us to start with integrity.

August 28: Trust is Built Upon Shadows and you can cast your shadow and light over your team.

August 29: Boards in Crisis- Where Trust is Forged & Broken provides advice for managing crises proactively.

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the Executive Director of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. She is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

PrintND Trust CEO cvr 140602-ft

Should you wish to communicate directly with Barbara, drop her a note at Barbara@trustacrossamerica.com

Copyright © 2014, Next Decade, Inc.

Aug
29

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

 

Late last year Trust Across America-Trust Around the World  published the first in a planned series of award-winning books.  TRUST INC., Strategies for Building Your Company’s Most Valuable Asset brings together the wisdom of 32 experts. Six months later we released our second book, Trust Inc. A Guide for Boards & C-SuitesIn this book, sixty experts have joined forces to offer 100 strategies.

Throughout the month of August, we will be featuring 31 essays from our second book. Each stands alone as an excellent resource in guiding Boards and C-Suites on driving a trust agenda at the highest level in the organization, and provides tools for those who choose to implement trust-building programs in their organization.

This twenty-ninth essay brings advice from my friend Davia Temin. She is CEO of the boutique management consultancy Temin and Company, is a crisis and reputation advisor, product marketing and media strategist, and leadership, communications, and media coach operating at the Board and leadership levels. Temin and Company creates, enhances and saves reputations for global corporations, professional services firms, colleges and universities, and individual CEOs and Board Directors. www.teminandco.com.   Davia  is also a 2014 Top Thought Leader in Trustworthy Business and a member of the Alliance of Trustworthy Business Experts.

Boards in Crisis — Where Trust is Forged and Broken

There is no time more fraught for Boards than a time of crisis.

Should the Board intervene publicly or let management handle the situation? How should the Chair, the Executive Committee, and the entire Board govern the crisis: fingers out, thumbs in; scrutinizing every move; taking over; or at arms length?

The Board’s actions will, of course, dictate how the crisis will resolve: whether the company’s reputation for trustworthiness will grow or diminish in the aftermath.

All depends upon the crisis. If the crisis revolves around CEO succession, leadership breaches or malfeasance, tragedies, or major corporate events such as mergers or acquisitions, the board must be strongly present and occasionally visible. But, at those times, when passions are running high, there may be dissension on the Board.

Best advice: boards must develop their own robust crisis plans prior to any crisis. They must enumerate what kinds of actions will be taken for different issues: their crisis strategies and philosophies, the speed at which they will work, and who on the board will be designated to play first string, even if — especially if — the Chair or CEO is implicated in some way.

(See paper at this link) www.teminandcompany.com/thought-leadership/884-reputation-agenda-for-directors-a-20-point-plan-for-boards-to-address-reputational-risk#.U_-AgICwIp8

Reputation is becoming one of the top priorities of corporate boards. The best way to protect reputation, and trustworthiness, is to plan before any crisis hits, adjust strategies in real time to fit the specifics of a crisis, and then for the board to execute its plan fearlessly.

 

I hope you have enjoyed this next sneak peak into our second book. If this brief look behind the door has been helpful, follow this link to order both of our books online.

And for those who want to catch up on the series, a quick reference on what’s been covered so far this month:

August 1: There’s a Reason Why We Call Them Trustees explains why being an “absentee landlord” doesn’t work.

August 2: Kill the Evening Before Dinner and take a small group of front line employees to dinner instead.

August 3: In Head of Business- Hope for the World we introduce the Winston “V” Model.

August 4: Reputation vs. Trust and why leaders should care more about the latter.

August 5: C-Suite Must Speak With a V.O.I.C.E. of Trust, a new communications model.

August 6: It Ain’t What You Do (It’s the Way You Do It) discusses an organization’s core values and traits.

August 7: Superficial CEOs and Their Boards talks about the fiduciary responsibility of board members.

August 8: Headline: Be the Leaders Others Will Follow we learn about consistency between actions and words.

August 9: Towards a Mindset for Corporate Responsibility requiring a shift in mindset on the part of boards.

August 10: Warning: Don’t Drown in the Slogan Swamp explores the (mis)use of slogans in corporate America.

August 11: Trust in the Boardroom in creating competitive advantage.

August 12: Three Ways to Build Trust  and organization that are blind to the dialogue.

August 13: Lead from the Front explains why it’s important to remove the filters between leaders and employees.

August 14: Building Trust For Boards & C-Suites and why published scientific evidence is important.

August 15: (Trust) Communication & the Hiring Process discusses engaging employees in the decision.

August 16: CEO Tip: Trust Your Board as Your Ally emphasizes the importance of trusting partnerships.

August 17: The Culture is the Secret Sauce that must bubble down from the Boardroom to the Mailroom.

August 18: Trust & Strategy Thinking reminds us that it is hard to trust when you cannot relate.

August 19: Be Proactive About Trust & Integrity: just handling problems as they arise is not enough.

August 20: Trust Traps reminds us to ask the tough questions.

August 21: Trust Danger Signs and the need for synergy between the Board and Senior Managers.

August 22: Trust & Public Rewards reminds us to publicly acknowledge and reward staff.

August 23: The Cost of Mistrust and 8 ways to develop it.

August 24: Forward-Thinking Boards Build Trust and will commit to lighthouse leadership and employee engagement.

August 25: When Trust Breaks Down: 5 Steps You Can Take to rebuild it.

August 26: The Key To Trust in the C-Suite is safety, but how do we create it?

August 27: Lead With Integrity & Character reminds us to start with integrity.

August 28: Trust is Built Upon Shadows and you can cast your shadow and light over your team.

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the Executive Director of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. She is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

PrintND Trust CEO cvr 140602-ft

Should you wish to communicate directly with Barbara, drop her a note at Barbara@trustacrossamerica.com

Copyright © 2014, Next Decade, Inc.

Aug
28

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

 

Late last year Trust Across America-Trust Around the World  published the first in a planned series of award-winning books.  TRUST INC., Strategies for Building Your Company’s Most Valuable Asset brings together the wisdom of 32 experts. Six months later we released our second book, Trust Inc. A Guide for Boards & C-SuitesIn this book, sixty experts have joined forces to offer 100 strategies.

Throughout the month of August, we will be featuring 31 essays from our second book. Each stands alone as an excellent resource in guiding Boards and C-Suites on driving a trust agenda at the highest level in the organization, and provides tools for those who choose to implement trust-building programs in their organization.

This twenty-eighth essay brings advice from Matthew T. Fritz, a leader and mentor in the field of complex organizational change, emotional intelligence, and organization strategy. A successful DoD senior-acquisition program manager and test leader, Matt is a 20-year active duty Field-Grade Officer and pilot with command-experience in the United States Air Force. Matt is also a certified acquisition professional, as well as a certified Emotional Intelligence Practitioner. You can learn more about Matthew Fritz on his personal blog at AdvancedVectors.com 

Trust Is Built Upon Shadows

Each of us is prone to believing our own legend, and as a result, must be aware of the shadows we cast. As can be observed when standing close to the fire, the further we move away from the light—the longer our shadow grows. Self-Awareness is the fire of knowledge burning brightly inside all of us. As we let our ego drive us further away from the fire, our shadow lengthens accordingly.

As the leader, you cast your shadow and light over your Team each day, and your Teammates take on the traits you impart upon them. As we demonstrate in our senior-military culture, a leader’s own actions and behavior shape the culture of their teammates more than any processes, hierarchy or manner of communicating. As the leader, you have the responsibility to create a culture that models and encourages trust.

Leaders have a responsibility to avoid a fate similar to that of Napoleon—for themselves and their Team. Be aware of your shadow and develop your ability to cast light in your environment. Better yet, find people in your life you can trust
to provide honest feedback and help you manage your shadow. Shadow-managers point you back to the light and stoke your fire to burn brighter. Be true to yourself and your integrity . . . it’s simpler than you think. Avoid the trap of believing in your own legend. Waterloo awaits those who fail in this pursuit!

 

I hope you have enjoyed this next sneak peak into our second book. If this brief look behind the door has been helpful, follow this link to order both of our books online.

And for those who want to catch up on the series, a quick reference on what’s been covered so far this month:

August 1: There’s a Reason Why We Call Them Trustees explains why being an “absentee landlord” doesn’t work.

August 2: Kill the Evening Before Dinner and take a small group of front line employees to dinner instead.

August 3: In Head of Business- Hope for the World we introduce the Winston “V” Model.

August 4: Reputation vs. Trust and why leaders should care more about the latter.

August 5: C-Suite Must Speak With a V.O.I.C.E. of Trust, a new communications model.

August 6: It Ain’t What You Do (It’s the Way You Do It) discusses an organization’s core values and traits.

August 7: Superficial CEOs and Their Boards talks about the fiduciary responsibility of board members.

August 8: Headline: Be the Leaders Others Will Follow we learn about consistency between actions and words.

August 9: Towards a Mindset for Corporate Responsibility requiring a shift in mindset on the part of boards.

August 10: Warning: Don’t Drown in the Slogan Swamp explores the (mis)use of slogans in corporate America.

August 11: Trust in the Boardroom in creating competitive advantage.

August 12: Three Ways to Build Trust  and organization that are blind to the dialogue.

August 13: Lead from the Front explains why it’s important to remove the filters between leaders and employees.

August 14: Building Trust For Boards & C-Suites and why published scientific evidence is important.

August 15: (Trust) Communication & the Hiring Process discusses engaging employees in the decision.

August 16: CEO Tip: Trust Your Board as Your Ally emphasizes the importance of trusting partnerships.

August 17: The Culture is the Secret Sauce that must bubble down from the Boardroom to the Mailroom.

August 18: Trust & Strategy Thinking reminds us that it is hard to trust when you cannot relate.

August 19: Be Proactive About Trust & Integrity: just handling problems as they arise is not enough.

August 20: Trust Traps reminds us to ask the tough questions.

August 21: Trust Danger Signs and the need for synergy between the Board and Senior Managers.

August 22: Trust & Public Rewards reminds us to publicly acknowledge and reward staff.

August 23: The Cost of Mistrust and 8 ways to develop it.

August 24: Forward-Thinking Boards Build Trust and will commit to lighthouse leadership and employee engagement.

August 25: When Trust Breaks Down: 5 Steps You Can Take to rebuild it.

August 26: The Key To Trust in the C-Suite is safety, but how do we create it?

August 27: Lead With Integrity & Character reminds us to start with integrity.

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the Executive Director of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. She is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

PrintND Trust CEO cvr 140602-ft

Should you wish to communicate directly with Barbara, drop her a note at Barbara@trustacrossamerica.com

Copyright © 2014, Next Decade, Inc.

Aug
27

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

 

Late last year Trust Across America-Trust Around the World  published the first in a planned series of award-winning books.  TRUST INC., Strategies for Building Your Company’s Most Valuable Asset brings together the wisdom of 32 experts. Six months later we released our second book, Trust Inc. A Guide for Boards & C-SuitesIn this book, sixty experts have joined forces to offer 100 strategies.

Throughout the month of August, we will be featuring 31 essays from our second book. Each stands alone as an excellent resource in guiding Boards and C-Suites on driving a trust agenda at the highest level in the organization, and provides tools for those who choose to implement trust-building programs in their organization.

This twenty-seventh essay brings advice from Jesse Stoner, a business leader, consultant, and author of several books including the international bestseller Full Steam Ahead! Unleash the Power of Vision, which has been translated into 21 languages. Over the past 25 years Jesse has worked with hundreds of leaders using collaborative processes to engage the entire workforce in creating their desired future. Her clients range from Fortune 500′s to non-profits worldwide, including Honda, Marriott, Edelman Public Relations, Skanska, and SAP to name a few. She writes an award winning leadership blog.

Lead with Integrity and Character

Your character is your greatest source of influence, no matter what your role or position. Your character is the expression of who you are. And influential character is built on a foundation of integrity.

Integrity is the commitment to consistently act on your values. Integrity means you can be trusted to say what you mean and do what you say.

When you are a leader, everything you say and do is magnified. You raise an eyebrow and people wonder what it means. You make an off-handed comment and people react strongly. Each nuance is considered a mandate.

This is the nature of leadership. It doesn’t matter whether you like it or not. Your actions are being scrutinized every moment. If you are slightly inconsistent, it is magnified in the view of others. You don’t have the luxury of cheating in a silly game or telling a crude joke. You can’t take “time off.”

You can get compliance through bullying and manipulation, but you won’t be trusted or respected. If you want to be a leader that people choose to follow, they must trust you.

Trust is a state that arises naturally like love, joy and gratitude. You can’t command it to arise in others, but you can create the conditions for it to arise. The only place you can start is to act in a trustworthy manner – with integrity.

 

I hope you have enjoyed this next sneak peak into our second book. If this brief look behind the door has been helpful, follow this link to order both of our books online.

And for those who want to catch up on the series, a quick reference on what’s been covered so far this month:

August 1: There’s a Reason Why We Call Them Trustees explains why being an “absentee landlord” doesn’t work.

August 2: Kill the Evening Before Dinner and take a small group of front line employees to dinner instead.

August 3: In Head of Business- Hope for the World we introduce the Winston “V” Model.

August 4: Reputation vs. Trust and why leaders should care more about the latter.

August 5: C-Suite Must Speak With a V.O.I.C.E. of Trust, a new communications model.

August 6: It Ain’t What You Do (It’s the Way You Do It) discusses an organization’s core values and traits.

August 7: Superficial CEOs and Their Boards talks about the fiduciary responsibility of board members.

August 8: Headline: Be the Leaders Others Will Follow we learn about consistency between actions and words.

August 9: Towards a Mindset for Corporate Responsibility requiring a shift in mindset on the part of boards.

August 10: Warning: Don’t Drown in the Slogan Swamp explores the (mis)use of slogans in corporate America.

August 11: Trust in the Boardroom in creating competitive advantage.

August 12: Three Ways to Build Trust  and organization that are blind to the dialogue.

August 13: Lead from the Front explains why it’s important to remove the filters between leaders and employees.

August 14: Building Trust For Boards & C-Suites and why published scientific evidence is important.

August 15: (Trust) Communication & the Hiring Process discusses engaging employees in the decision.

August 16: CEO Tip: Trust Your Board as Your Ally emphasizes the importance of trusting partnerships.

August 17: The Culture is the Secret Sauce that must bubble down from the Boardroom to the Mailroom.

August 18: Trust & Strategy Thinking reminds us that it is hard to trust when you cannot relate.

August 19: Be Proactive About Trust & Integrity: just handling problems as they arise is not enough.

August 20: Trust Traps reminds us to ask the tough questions.

August 21: Trust Danger Signs and the need for synergy between the Board and Senior Managers.

August 22: Trust & Public Rewards reminds us to publicly acknowledge and reward staff.

August 23: The Cost of Mistrust and 8 ways to develop it.

August 24: Forward-Thinking Boards Build Trust and will commit to lighthouse leadership and employee engagement.

August 25: When Trust Breaks Down: 5 Steps You Can Take to rebuild it.

August 26: The Key To Trust in the C-Suite is safety, but how do we create it?

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the Executive Director of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. She is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

PrintND Trust CEO cvr 140602-ft

Should you wish to communicate directly with Barbara, drop her a note at Barbara@trustacrossamerica.com

Copyright © 2014, Next Decade, Inc.

Aug
26

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

 

Late last year Trust Across America-Trust Around the World  published the first in a planned series of award-winning books.  TRUST INC., Strategies for Building Your Company’s Most Valuable Asset brings together the wisdom of 32 experts. Six months later we released our second book, Trust Inc. A Guide for Boards & C-SuitesIn this book, sixty experts have joined forces to offer 100 strategies.

Throughout the month of August, we will be featuring 31 essays from our second book. Each stands alone as an excellent resource in guiding Boards and C-Suites on driving a trust agenda at the highest level in the organization, and provides tools for those who choose to implement trust-building programs in their organization.

This twenty-sixth essay brings advice from Edward Marshall, the President of The Marshall Group, Inc., a Chapel Hill, North Carolina collaborative leadership consulting firm that for 30 years has worked with senior leadership of Fortune 500 businesses to create collaborative leadership cultures that result in high trust and sustainable results. He has led over 150 engagements at companies like Marriott, Microsoft, Philips, and DuPont, work that has won awards and best practice designation. He developed The Collaborative Method(sm), a suite of leadership and culture change services. Edward has two business best-sellers, including Building Trust at the Speed of Change. He is also 2014 Top Thought Leaders in Trustworthy Business and members of the Alliance of Trustworthy Business Experts.

The Key to Trust in the C-Suite: Building Psychological Safety

Trust is the goal in any relationship, and it is the emotional capital sought after by business leaders. We cannot achieve much without it. It is hard to build, easy to lose, and once lost, hard to regain.

To build and sustain trust, organizational psychologists tell us, there must be psychological safety. This means freedom to speak one’s truth responsibly without fear of retribution. The NASA investigation of the Columbia crash found that a key reason for the failure was the fear scientists had to tell their truth to top leadership; it had disastrous consequences.

How do we create safety?

For individual leaders, it means self-awareness about how leadership behaviors impact others—trust or fear? It’s an awareness of one’s leadership style and philosophy, and how they affect the motivation of others.

For senior teams, safety requires confidentiality, candor, collaboration, mutual respect, and supporting each other, especially in adversity.

For organizations, it means an ownership strategy that engages the workforce, transparency and openness, rewarding team accomplishments, and recognizing the value and gifts of every individual.

The goal is to replace fear with trust as the organizational culture. The benefits will be found in increased morale, productivity, innovation, speed, agility, pride in the workplace, value to the customer, and sustained high performance.

Creating a trust-based workplace is not about leadership training, habits, or tools. It is a commitment from the inside out. It’s not always easy, but the view from the mountaintop is worth the climb.

I hope you have enjoyed this next sneak peak into our second book. If this brief look behind the door has been helpful, follow this link to order both of our books online.

And for those who want to catch up on the series, a quick reference on what’s been covered so far this month:

August 1: There’s a Reason Why We Call Them Trustees explains why being an “absentee landlord” doesn’t work.

August 2: Kill the Evening Before Dinner and take a small group of front line employees to dinner instead.

August 3: In Head of Business- Hope for the World we introduce the Winston “V” Model.

August 4: Reputation vs. Trust and why leaders should care more about the latter.

August 5: C-Suite Must Speak With a V.O.I.C.E. of Trust, a new communications model.

August 6: It Ain’t What You Do (It’s the Way You Do It) discusses an organization’s core values and traits.

August 7: Superficial CEOs and Their Boards talks about the fiduciary responsibility of board members.

August 8: Headline: Be the Leaders Others Will Follow we learn about consistency between actions and words.

August 9: Towards a Mindset for Corporate Responsibility requiring a shift in mindset on the part of boards.

August 10: Warning: Don’t Drown in the Slogan Swamp explores the (mis)use of slogans in corporate America.

August 11: Trust in the Boardroom in creating competitive advantage.

August 12: Three Ways to Build Trust  and organization that are blind to the dialogue.

August 13: Lead from the Front explains why it’s important to remove the filters between leaders and employees.

August 14: Building Trust For Boards & C-Suites and why published scientific evidence is important.

August 15: (Trust) Communication & the Hiring Process discusses engaging employees in the decision.

August 16: CEO Tip: Trust Your Board as Your Ally emphasizes the importance of trusting partnerships.

August 17: The Culture is the Secret Sauce that must bubble down from the Boardroom to the Mailroom.

August 18: Trust & Strategy Thinking reminds us that it is hard to trust when you cannot relate.

August 19: Be Proactive About Trust & Integrity: just handling problems as they arise is not enough.

August 20: Trust Traps reminds us to ask the tough questions.

August 21: Trust Danger Signs and the need for synergy between the Board and Senior Managers.

August 22: Trust & Public Rewards reminds us to publicly acknowledge and reward staff.

August 23: The Cost of Mistrust and 8 ways to develop it.

August 24: Forward-Thinking Boards Build Trust and will commit to lighthouse leadership and employee engagement.

August 25: When Trust Breaks Down: 5 Steps You Can Take to rebuild it.

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the Executive Director of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. She is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

PrintND Trust CEO cvr 140602-ft

Should you wish to communicate directly with Barbara, drop her a note at Barbara@trustacrossamerica.com

Copyright © 2014, Next Decade, Inc.

Aug
25

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

 

Late last year Trust Across America-Trust Around the World  published the first in a planned series of award-winning books.  TRUST INC., Strategies for Building Your Company’s Most Valuable Asset brings together the wisdom of 32 experts. Six months later we released our second book, Trust Inc. A Guide for Boards & C-SuitesIn this book, sixty experts have joined forces to offer 100 strategies.

Throughout the month of August, we will be featuring 31 essays from our second book. Each stands alone as an excellent resource in guiding Boards and C-Suites on driving a trust agenda at the highest level in the organization, and provides tools for those who choose to implement trust-building programs in their organization.

This twenty-fifth essay brings advice from Dennis Reina, Ph.D., and Michelle Reina, Ph.D. who pioneered the study of trust in the workplace in the early 1990s and co-authored the bestselling books Trust and Betrayal in the Workplace and Rebuilding Trust in the WorkplaceDennis and Michelle, are co- founders of Reina, A Trust Building Consultancyare international speakers, executive coaches, and consultants specializing in measuring, developing, and restoring workplace trust. They are also 2014 Top Thought Leaders in Trustworthy Business and members of the Alliance of Trustworthy Business Experts.

Five Steps You Can Take When Trust Breaks Down

Leaders frequently do the opposite of what is needed when trust breaks down. They tend to pull back, rationalize their trust-breaking behavior, intellectualize its impact, and move on, as if nothing happened. This approach exacerbates the breakdown of trust, rather than restores it. Others see such behavior as insensitive, uncaring, and an abdication of responsibility to honor people and relationships. People perceive they don’t matter. In turn, they lose confidence in their leaders.

What you can do to rebuild trust:

  1. Muster the courage to step into the challenge, acknowledge the breakdown in trust, seek to understand its impact, and the losses associated with it. Rebuilding trust begins with you.
  2. Foster a safe and trustworthy venue for appropriate parties to voice their concerns about what contributed to the breakdown. Provide support for people to rebuild trust relations.
  3. Help them see their role in the erosion of trust and how their behavioral responses to it either mitigated or exacerbated the initial breach. Consider options to learn from these mistakes.
  4. Lead people to take responsibility for their behavior and to make amends when and where appropriate. Hold them accountable.
  5. Support people to let go and move on.

When trust is compromised, rebuilding it requires leaders to consciously and consistently practice these steps as a way of supporting themselves and others to return to doing their best work. Someone has to take the first step to restore trust. Let it be you.

I hope you have enjoyed this next sneak peak into our second book. If this brief look behind the door has been helpful, follow this link to order both of our books online.

And for those who want to catch up on the series, a quick reference on what’s been covered so far this month:

August 1: There’s a Reason Why We Call Them Trustees explains why being an “absentee landlord” doesn’t work.

August 2: Kill the Evening Before Dinner and take a small group of front line employees to dinner instead.

August 3: In Head of Business- Hope for the World we introduce the Winston “V” Model.

August 4: Reputation vs. Trust and why leaders should care more about the latter.

August 5: C-Suite Must Speak With a V.O.I.C.E. of Trust, a new communications model.

August 6: It Ain’t What You Do (It’s the Way You Do It) discusses an organization’s core values and traits.

August 7: Superficial CEOs and Their Boards talks about the fiduciary responsibility of board members.

August 8: Headline: Be the Leaders Others Will Follow we learn about consistency between actions and words.

August 9: Towards a Mindset for Corporate Responsibility requiring a shift in mindset on the part of boards.

August 10: Warning: Don’t Drown in the Slogan Swamp explores the (mis)use of slogans in corporate America.

August 11: Trust in the Boardroom in creating competitive advantage.

August 12: Three Ways to Build Trust  and organization that are blind to the dialogue.

August 13: Lead from the Front explains why it’s important to remove the filters between leaders and employees.

August 14: Building Trust For Boards & C-Suites and why published scientific evidence is important.

August 15: (Trust) Communication & the Hiring Process discusses engaging employees in the decision.

August 16: CEO Tip: Trust Your Board as Your Ally emphasizes the importance of trusting partnerships.

August 17: The Culture is the Secret Sauce that must bubble down from the Boardroom to the Mailroom.

August 18: Trust & Strategy Thinking reminds us that it is hard to trust when you cannot relate.

August 19: Be Proactive About Trust & Integrity: just handling problems as they arise is not enough.

August 20: Trust Traps reminds us to ask the tough questions.

August 21: Trust Danger Signs and the need for synergy between the Board and Senior Managers.

August 22: Trust & Public Rewards reminds us to publicly acknowledge and reward staff.

August 23: The Cost of Mistrust and 8 ways to develop it.

August 24: Forward-Thinking Boards Build Trust and will commit to lighthouse leadership and employee engagement.

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the Executive Director of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. She is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

PrintND Trust CEO cvr 140602-ft

Should you wish to communicate directly with Barbara, drop her a note at Barbara@trustacrossamerica.com

Copyright © 2014, Next Decade, Inc.

Aug
24

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

 

Late last year Trust Across America-Trust Around the World  published the first in a planned series of award-winning books.  TRUST INC., Strategies for Building Your Company’s Most Valuable Asset brings together the wisdom of 32 experts. Six months later we released our second book, Trust Inc. A Guide for Boards & C-SuitesIn this book, sixty experts have joined forces to offer 100 strategies.

Throughout the month of August, we will be featuring 31 essays from our second book. Each stands alone as an excellent resource in guiding Boards and C-Suites on driving a trust agenda at the highest level in the organization, and provides tools for those who choose to implement trust-building programs in their organization.

This twenty-fourth essay brings advice from Tom McCoy, Executive Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary at CH2M Hill. Tom is also the retired Executive Vice President, Legal Affairs, and Chief Administrative Officer of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc., where he served in leadership for 16 years.

Forward-Thinking Boards

Forward-thinking boards will commit to lighthouse leadership and rebuilding employee engagement and trust

The S&P 500 is up around $175%, but employee engagement languishes — and for good reason. Shareholders and option-laden directors and executives are winning while wage earners are losing and retirement security for most people continues to slip. Boards are buffeted by short-term investor pressure and remain absorbed in rear-view mirrors, activist investor gun sights and enterprise (and, understandably, personal) risk management. Leadership teams no longer trust the board to give them time and space to build long-term value and careers, and employees’ confidence in organizational and economic justice has not recovered from the impacts of a frightening recession. Yet, the business fundamentals have not changed.

A company cannot sustainably grow profitable market share and outperform its peers with employees who are not unified, inspired, growing and secure that the board of directors and the leadership team authentically care about their well- being, their potential and their communities. Without putting employees first, no company can out-innovate, out-engineer, out-think and out-hustle its competitors to delight customers and earn superior returns for shareholders. The nimble execution of strategy — and change — requires high trust, high integrity and high performance culture. History teaches, and contemporary politics confirm, that an enduring failure to balance smartly the power of capital and capitalists with the needs of employees and communities leads to populist pressure for policies and regulations that may serve no one very well in the long run.

Corporate Executive Board studies prove that employee perceptions of organizational justice explain 75% of their perception of integrity and competence of the board and the leadership team. E.g., Corporate Executive Board, Compliance and Ethics Leadership Council, Protecting a Culture of Integrity in a Downturn (2009). Today’s perceptions are largely poor. There is no better time in the fragile aftermath of the recession to refocus investment in the long-term high performance of human capital, the most valuable of all resources in the corporate treasury.

 

I hope you have enjoyed this next sneak peak into our second book. If this brief look behind the door has been helpful, follow this link to order both of our books online.

And for those who want to catch up on the series, a quick reference on what’s been covered so far this month:

August 1: There’s a Reason Why We Call Them Trustees explains why being an “absentee landlord” doesn’t work.

August 2: Kill the Evening Before Dinner and take a small group of front line employees to dinner instead.

August 3: In Head of Business- Hope for the World we introduce the Winston “V” Model.

August 4: Reputation vs. Trust and why leaders should care more about the latter.

August 5: C-Suite Must Speak With a V.O.I.C.E. of Trust, a new communications model.

August 6: It Ain’t What You Do (It’s the Way You Do It) discusses an organization’s core values and traits.

August 7: Superficial CEOs and Their Boards talks about the fiduciary responsibility of board members.

August 8: Headline: Be the Leaders Others Will Follow we learn about consistency between actions and words.

August 9: Towards a Mindset for Corporate Responsibility requiring a shift in mindset on the part of boards.

August 10: Warning: Don’t Drown in the Slogan Swamp explores the (mis)use of slogans in corporate America.

August 11: Trust in the Boardroom in creating competitive advantage.

August 12: Three Ways to Build Trust  and organization that are blind to the dialogue.

August 13: Lead from the Front explains why it’s important to remove the filters between leaders and employees.

August 14: Building Trust For Boards & C-Suites and why published scientific evidence is important.

August 15: (Trust) Communication & the Hiring Process discusses engaging employees in the decision.

August 16: CEO Tip: Trust Your Board as Your Ally emphasizes the importance of trusting partnerships.

August 17: The Culture is the Secret Sauce that must bubble down from the Boardroom to the Mailroom.

August 18: Trust & Strategy Thinking reminds us that it is hard to trust when you cannot relate.

August 19: Be Proactive About Trust & Integrity: just handling problems as they arise is not enough.

August 20: Trust Traps reminds us to ask the tough questions.

August 21: Trust Danger Signs and the need for synergy between the Board and Senior Managers.

August 22: Trust & Public Rewards reminds us to publicly acknowledge and reward staff.

August 23: The Cost of Mistrust and 8 ways to develop it.

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the Executive Director of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. She is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

PrintND Trust CEO cvr 140602-ft

Should you wish to communicate directly with Barbara, drop her a note at Barbara@trustacrossamerica.com

Copyright © 2014, Next Decade, Inc.