Oct
31

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

 

There are nights when the wolves are silent and only the moon howls. ~George Carlin

 

Today is Halloween, the second most lucrative holiday after Christmas, with Americans spending over $6 billion annually on costumes and candy.

Did you ever wonder about the origin of the phrase “trick or treat?” I hadn’t until today. For example, did you know that Halloween may have its roots in an ancient Celtic festival call Samhain? This article has all sorts of interesting facts about the holiday.

And if that doesn’t satisfy your appetite, you might want to read this one where the debate between who “owns” Halloween, the Celts or the Christians is explored in (maybe too much) depth.

All this information may leave you wondering what this post has to do with trust. In reality, it wasn’t all that easy to find the link, but the CDC will tell you in Halloween Health and Safety Tips.

HalloweenIMG_0807

 

Enjoy your day. I’ll be participating in a local “ghost walk” this evening to learn about all the haunted buildings in my community.

PS- Happy Birthday Mom!

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the Executive Director of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. She is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and the Executive Editor of TRUST! Magazine. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

Nominations are now being accepted for Trust Across America-Trust Around the World’s 5th annual Global Top Thought Leaders in Trustworthy Business.

Have you seen our brand new magazine TRUST!

Fall 14 Trust Magazine-Cover

                                                                                               

Copyright © 2014, Next Decade, Inc.

 

Oct
30

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

Destiny is no matter of chance. It is a matter of choice. It is not a thing to be waited for, it is a thing to be achieved–  William Jennings Bryan

Early this week we published the inaugural edition of TRUST! Magazine. It features stories of companies and leaders in the financial services industry who are NOT the bad apples we read about daily in the press. These stories contain dozens of best practices that can be emulated and replicated in companies that choose to put trust on their daily docket.

The people who contributed to this magazine are as diverse as the subject of trust itself- Jan Lynn Owen, a California Banking Commissioner, Brad Katsuyama, who’s name you may recall from 60 Minutes, Steven Mandis a former Goldman Sachs investment banker, Bruce Cahan a visiting scholar at Stanford University, Jack Hubbard, a member of our trust alliance, who has spent decades teaching bankers how to be trustworthy, and David Reiling the CEO of Sunrise Banks, to name just a few. These are the people who are leading the movement to change the way business is done. These are the people who not only talk trust but walk it too.

In compiling this magazine, I was reminded again and again that industry is not destiny. Similar to the NFL, the good players have their reputation’s tarnished by a handful of thugs.

Five years ago, Trust Across America-Trust Around the World developed the only holistic, quantitative measurement of the trustworthiness of public companies. We call it our FACTS Framework and we have been carefully tracking individual company and industry performance since then. The “trust trends”, and even the risks we see, are very different than what some of the companies choose to talk about, and what the opinion polls would have you believe. Companies that rise to the top of our model have similar DNA, regardless of their industry. Their thinking is holistic and “long-term” and they crush their competition.

Trust begins with trustworthy leadership at the Board & C-Suite level. We’ve published two award-winning books on the subject with a third out in November. Trust is built over time and in incremental steps. It doesn’t matter what the industry. The steps are the same. If trust is considered a business imperative, it is built into the corporate credo, vision and values, and practiced every day by everyone. It is reinforced at every opportunity.

No company is perfect, but trust ALWAYS begins with the internal actions of leadership. Don’t believe for a minute that industry is destiny. Not yet convinced? Read our magazine and see for yourself.

PS- An early observation based on sales… the majority of buyers are not US based. What does that tell you?

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the Executive Director of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. She is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and the Executive Editor of TRUST! Magazine. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

Nominations are now being accepted for Trust Across America-Trust Around the World’s 5th annual Global Top Thought Leaders in Trustworthy Business.

Have you seen our brand new magazine TRUST!

Fall 14 Trust Magazine-Cover

                                                                                               

Copyright © 2014, Next Decade, Inc.

Oct
29

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

 

The truth is, being the leader of a healthy organization is just plain hard. But in the end, it is undeniably worth it. - Patrick Lencioni

Earlier this week I wrote a blog post called Trust & Leaders: Warmth or Strength? citing a recent research study on trust and leadership.  I decided to follow up with one of the authors and take a deeper dive into the impact of trust on organizational health.

Peter Glick, PhD is the Henry Merritt Wriston Professor in the Social Sciences at Lawrence University. As a Visiting Professor of Management and Organizations, he co-designed the first course on diversity management at Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management. Dr. Glick co-developed award-winning theories on benevolent sexism and the warmth-competence model, recognized as a “breakthrough idea for 2009″ by the Harvard Business Review. Tested worldwide, both models are among the most highly cited theories in social psychology. www2.lawrence.edu/fast/glickp/

 

Question: Peter, why is trust important to organizational health?

Without trust, organizational costs go up and effectiveness goes down. Trust breeds commitment and motivation among an organization’s members to accomplish the organization’s goals. Without it, leaders need to exercise heavy-handed control and surveillance to make sure that others perform their roles, creating a downward cycle in which trust erodes and organization members have little enthusiasm for their work. Although a trust-poor organization may get by when technology makes it possible to track key work outcomes, mistrust pits subordinates against leaders and prompts counter-productive behavior (e.g., evading work, pilfering, etc.). When people view the organization as untrustworthy, they feel exploited and, therefore, justified in pursuing self-interest rather than organizational goals.

Question: What role do business schools and executive education programs play in building trustworthy business cultures?

Business schools and executive education programs play an important, but necessarily limited role in promoting trustworthy business cultures. What business schools and exec ed programs can do well is to make the strong case that leaders cannot be effective over the long haul unless they promote genuine trust. By emphasizing research and focusing on teaching cases that establish the crucial role trust plays in securing organizational commitment, business schools can get the message out. Ultimately, however, organizational leaders are the ones who have to carry it through by behaving in ways that promote trust (and not just the appearance of trustworthiness).

Question: Do we have a trust crisis?

I think we do! And it is likely to be a perpetual one unless leaders work consistently and diligently to promote trust in their organizations. Here’s why: It’s not that leaders today are less trustworthy than leaders of the past, but in contemporary culture they face more scrutiny than ever for several reasons. Trust thrives best in small, close-knit groups where people interact with each other over the long haul and accomplishing group goals is integral to personal well-being. This is the environment where humans evolved – tightly knit groups where working hard for the group enabled the individual to survive and thrive. In our contemporary environment, such long-term, interdependent relationships are rarer. As a result, we are generally more skeptical about leaders and their motives, both in politics (where personal attack has become the modus operandi) and business (in which short-term profit motives too often trump building long-term trust).  

Second, any misstep now blows up on the internet or social media. Combine general skepticism with increased scrutiny and trust becomes hard to build and maintain. For example, Microsoft CEO Satyep Nadella’s recent comment that women should trust the corporation to recognize their talents rather than asking for raises elicited a firestorm precisely because women have learned not to trust that companies will reward them for silently doing good work.

Question: What one question did I forget to ask?

Why is trust so easy to lose?

Leaders need to understand that trust is a precious commodity that is hard won and easily lost. Why is that so? Think about the contrast between establishing trustworthiness and competence (the two fundamental dimensions in how we perceive people, as established in my joint research with Susan Fiske and Amy Cuddy). When people doubt your competence, successfully performing a difficult task, landing a big account, or pitching a great idea can overcome others’ doubts. By contrast, think of what happens when people doubt your trustworthiness — how can you prove they are wrong? Although you can prove your abilities, if I doubt your motives, then anything you do can be interpreted as manipulative, part of a plan to gain my trust only to exploit me. Consider this scenario: you overhear a person who has always been nice to your face tell a demeaning lie about you behind your back. Will you ever trust that person again? Probably not. We all understand that untrustworthy people have strong incentives to seem trustworthy: “con man” is short for “confidence man” because you can’t “con” another person unless they are confident that you are trustworthy. Therefore we take a single instance of untrustworthiness as indicating another individual’s “true colors.” Once trust is lost, it is extremely difficult to gain it back.  

Thank you Peter for your valuable insights on organization trust. Please keep us posted on any new research on the subject.

 

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the Executive Director of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. She is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and the Executive Editor of TRUST! Magazine. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

Nominations are now being accepted for Trust Across America-Trust Around the World’s 5th annual Global Top Thought Leaders in Trustworthy Business.

Have you seen our brand new magazine TRUST! Fall 14 Trust Magazine-Cover

                                                                                               

Copyright © 2014, Next Decade, Inc.

Oct
28

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

 

A lack of transparency results in distrust and a deep sense of insecurity– Dalai Lama

How many of the following ten “trust” danger signs are present in your organization?

  1. Passion is missing and so is the boss
  2. Bureaucracy is increasing as is the compliance staff
  3. Closed doors have become the norm, as well as the conversations behind them
  4. Decisions take forever
  5. Employees are disengaged and turnover is increasing
  6. There is more talk and less listening
  7. Nobody ever fails, a sign of little to no innovation
  8. Empathy and kindness are rarities
  9. Transparency has taken a back seat to secrecy
  10. The “giving” has stopped and the day of the “free turkey” is over

 

The business case for trust  has been made. Beware of the “trust” danger signs and address them before distrust becomes the norm.

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the Executive Director of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. She is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and the Executive Editor of TRUST! Magazine. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

Nominations are now being accepted for Trust Across America-Trust Around the World’s 5th annual Global Top Thought Leaders in Trustworthy Business.

Have you seen our brand new magazine TRUST!

Fall 14 Trust Magazine-Cover

                                                                                               

Copyright © 2014, Next Decade, Inc.

 

Oct
27

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

 

Lay a strong foundation of trust or make a costly fix in the future. You decide.  Barbara Brooks Kimmel

Over time, homes built on weak foundations develop structural issues- cracked walls, crooked floors, leaky roofs. Organizations are no different.

Yesterday I was speaking with someone who holds a senior position in a startup company. I asked him whether trust is being built into the DNA. After he rolled his eyes, he said “the “team” was too busy for that.” I cautioned that the road ahead could be very bumpy and inefficient, and that long-term success was questionable. Then I turned my back and rolled my eyes!

Building trust into the business strategy at the startup stage increases efficiency (more timely, less costly) and is so much easier and less expensive than making the repairs later on.

These are three steps startups can take to build a foundation of trust. We call this our VIP Model (Values, Integrity, Promises Kept).

Vision & Values: Leaders must collaboratively identify what the organization wants to achieve. Why does it exist and what does it stand for? Bring the team together to write a statement of values or a corporate credo. Discuss it weekly. Modify as required. Don’t know where to start? Here’s a sample. We can direct you to other resources as well.

Integrity: Model openness and vulnerability; use transparent decision making; listen carefully; ask for input; don’t bite off more than you can chew; don’t exaggerate or make false claims; communicate and then communicate again.

Promises: What are the goals and intentions for each of your stakeholder groups? What promises can you make and what steps do you need to take to fulfill them? Do not make promises you can’t keep.

Don’t wait to build trust into your organization’s DNA. The stronger the foundation, the lower the likelihood of cracked walls in the future.

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the Executive Director of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. She is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and the Executive Editor of TRUST! Magazine. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

Nominations are now being accepted for Trust Across America-Trust Around the World’s 5th annual Global Top Thought Leaders in Trustworthy Business.

Have you seen our brand new magazine TRUST!

Fall 14 Trust Magazine-Cover

                                                                                               

Copyright © 2014, Next Decade, Inc.

 

Oct
26

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

 

A warm smile is the universal language of kindness. William Arthur Ward

There are several frameworks and models of trustworthy leadership. Some describe the “three C’S” of Character, Competence and Consistency, while another substitutes “consistency” for compassion. Randy Conley, the Vice President of Client Services & Trust Practice Leader for The Ken Blanchard Companies, and one of our Alliance members, employs the ABCDs as a model (Able, Believable, Connected, Dependable.) At Trust Across America we like to say that trustworthy leaders are VIPS’s (Values, Integrity and Promises kept.)

Yesterday a colleague shared this Harvard Business Review article discussing the work of behavioral science researchers at Princeton (Amy Cuddy and Susan Fiske) and Lawrence University’s Peter Glick.  Simply, the most influential traits of great leaders are warmth and strength. The difficulty comes in deciding which comes first, and if you are like me, you will be surprised at the findings.

Why are these traits so important? Because they answer two critical questions: “What are this person’s intentions toward me?” and “Is he or she capable of acting on those intentions?” Together, these assessments underlie our emotional and behavioral reactions to other people, groups, and even brands and companies. 

When considering the most important traits of those who lead with trust, which do you think comes first, warmth or strength?

Drop me a note at Barbara@trustacrossamerica.com or leave a comment.

 

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the Executive Director of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. She is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and the Executive Editor of TRUST! Magazine. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

Nominations are now being accepted for Trust Across America-Trust Around the World’s 5th annual Global Top Thought Leaders in Trustworthy Business.

Have you seen our brand new magazine TRUST!

Fall 14 Trust Magazine-Cover

                                                                                               

Copyright © 2014, Next Decade, Inc.

 

Oct
25

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

 

Trust in senior executives’ leadership capabilities sets the tone for the entire organization Lolly Daskal

(from Trust Across America’s Weekly Reflections on Trust 2014)

Organizational Trust this Week is a new feature beginning with the “Good” and ending with the “Ugly.” Each story contains a trust component and at least one lesson for organizations seeking to make trust a business imperative.

THE GOOD

Industry is NOT destiny, even in financial services. Our new magazine TRUST! tells the stories of the “good guys” who have built trust into the DNA of their organizations.

This article gets right to the heart of trust as a business imperative. Trust: The Must Have for the 21st Century Leader

Five Ways Elite Teams Must be Lead (including trust & loyalty)

Five Powerful Habits of Extraordinary Leaders (a trusting workplace is key)

 

THE BAD

The word “expert” has always intrigued me. After all, what is an expert? Why Don’t Americans Trust Experts?

Splitting the Roles of Chairman & CEO are good for companies (and good for trust) so why the resistance?

 

THE UGLY

Academic fraud is a tough “trust nut” to swallow. Negligence or Worse?

OUR MOST POPULAR POST THIS WEEK

And finally, Trust Across America-Trust Around the World’s most popular post on LinkedIn Pulse this week. One CEOs Advice About Trust

Send us your stories for consideration in future editions of Organizational Trust this Week: barbara@trustacrossamerica.com

 

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the Executive Director of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. She is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and the Executive Editor of TRUST! Magazine. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

Nominations are now being accepted for Trust Across America-Trust Around the World’s 5th annual Global Top Thought Leaders in Trustworthy Business.

PrintND Trust CEO cvr 140602-ft914Trust front Cover

                                                                                               Coming Soon!

Should you wish to communicate directly with Barbara, drop her a note at Barbara@trustacrossamerica.com

Copyright © 2014, Next Decade, Inc.

 

Oct
24

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

“Destiny is not a matter of chance, but of choice.

Not something to wish for, but to attain.”

— William Jennings Bryan

 

Since the financial crisis of 2008 the media’s fixation on the “rotten apples” in the industry has been unrelenting. Under the theory that “bad news sells” the public is reminded daily and left with diminishing expectations for a return to a more trustworthy financial services environment.

But what if I told you there is a silver lining? Contrary to popular belief, when it comes to trust, industry is NEVER destiny.

In the inaugural edition of TRUST! Magazine, we bring together global experts to help us explore companies and leaders who have chosen a different path. These are NOT the stories we hear about in the news, but they are the ones that SHOULD be reported. We have chosen to provide the public with the “other side” of this coin, not just corporate window dressing “best practices,” but actually, the “real deal.”

Trust has been built into the corporate DNA at these financial institutions. It is at the heart of how business is done, and it is practiced and reinforced daily. When we started Trust Across America-Trust Around the World in 2009, our mission was to highlight the “good guys” and showcase their best practices in an unbiased and impartial manner.  Consistent with our approach over the past five years, our readers will not find a single advertisement in this 50+ page magazine. We have elected instead to charge a small fee to cover our costs.

We hope you find value in the Magazine and choose to share it with others. Together we can push this enormous trust boulder up the hill.

 

Fall 14 Trust Magazine-Cover

ACCESS THE TABLE OF CONTENTS AND LEARN MORE

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the Executive Director of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. She is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series, and Executive Editor of TRUST! Magazine. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

Nominations are now being accepted for Trust Across America-Trust Around the World’s 5th annual Global Top Thought Leaders in Trustworthy Business.

Oct
23

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

Communication leads to community, that is, to understanding, intimacy and mutual valuing. Rollo May

Nan Russell, a member of our Trust Alliance and author of Trust, Inc.: How to Create a Business Culture That Will Ignite Passion, Engagement, and Innovation, shares 12 Communication Practices That Elevate Communication and Build Trust in today’s blog post:

The communication practices below lift understanding, create aligned purpose, improve relationships, and enable healthy and productive differences, and while doing so, increase trust-building:

  1. Know what matters to the people you lead
  2. Have dialogues without personal agendas or assumed answers
  3. Express heartfelt, specific gratitude
  4. Be forthcoming about your objective, purpose, or goal
  5. Align your actions with your words
  6. Operate with thoughtful transparency
  7. Paint word-pictures to make something seeable, doable, and purposeful
  8. Be about the right action, not the action that’s right for you
  9. Be open to all methods of communication
  10. Offer feedback as opinion, not fact
  11. Listen to learn
  12. Be the message, not the messenger, for respect, integrity, and compassion

Communication that builds trust is elevated because it brings honesty, integrity, authenticity, and caring into the conversation.

Thank you Nan for sharing this guest blog post with us. For more information about Nan, visit her website.

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the Executive Director of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. She is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

Nominations are now being accepted for Trust Across America-Trust Around the World’s 5th annual Global Top Thought Leaders in Trustworthy Business.

PrintND Trust CEO cvr 140602-ft914Trust front Cover

                                                                                               Coming Soon!

Should you wish to communicate directly with Barbara, drop her a note at Barbara@trustacrossamerica.com

Copyright © 2014, Next Decade, Inc.

 

Oct
22

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

Followers who tell the truth, and leaders who listen to it, are an unbeatable combination  – Warren Bennis

 

Last week Jack Haren, the President and CFO of Mohawk Fine Papers, Inc. delivered a short speech at the CFO of the Year Luncheon in Troy, NY. Mohawk is North America’s largest privately owned (4th generation) manufacturer of fine papers, envelopes and specialty substrates for commercial and digital printing. Jack chose the subject of trust and was kind enough to allow me to reprint his speech.

 

I have selected the question: What advice would you give someone going into leadership position for the first time? 

Putting aside the obvious ingredients of diligence and hard work, the INSIGHT that I would share is that long term career success is powered by the ability to generate TRUST.

Merriam- Webster dictionary defines trust as the assured reliance on the character, ability and strength of someone or something.

——————————————————————————————–

As a mentor, I would remind them that Trust cannot be purchased. It doesn’t come with a college degree, your family name or your zip code.

It can only be earned.

It comes forth from the values you exhibit…the way you interact with peers, subordinates and superiors.    

It comes when you demonstrate that the MEANS that you employ to accomplish an end have as much to say about your success as the final result.

 ——————————————————————————————–

I would remind them that Trust is fueled by consistency, fairness and openness.

It is strengthened by adversity.

It is built up over a series of experiences, a series of projects, a period of years.

——————————————————————————————–

Finally, it is a quality that will draw others to you.  It is an essential of  leadership.

BUT a caution…it is very fragile… so handle it with great care.

 

Thank you Jack. Your commitment to trust is reflected in the ongoing success of your company.

 

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the Executive Director of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. She is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

Nominations are now being accepted for Trust Across America-Trust Around the World’s 5th annual Global Top Thought Leaders in Trustworthy Business.

PrintND Trust CEO cvr 140602-ft914Trust front Cover

                                                                                               Coming Soon!

Should you wish to communicate directly with Barbara, drop her a note at Barbara@trustacrossamerica.com

Copyright © 2014, Next Decade, Inc.