May
27

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

 

Trust is the glue that binds every good relationship, or so we are told. The challenge not only lies in both definition and degree of trust, but too many people believe they are trustworthy when, in reality, they are not. In fact, both business leaders (and criminals) suffer from what is called “The Better than Average Effect,”  and we’ve all fallen victim to this psychological phenomenon at one time or another.

Think about how trust “worthy” you consider yourself and then check off how many of the following apply to you. You may not be quite as trust “worthy” as you thought.

  1. Trust me, but don’t turn your back.
  2. Trust me, but I come first.
  3. Trust me, but I’m the boss.
  4. Trust me, but I don’t walk my talk.
  5. Trust me, but only in the office.
  6. Trust me, but quarterly numbers trump employee well-being.
  7. Trust me, but if the going gets rough…
  8. Trust me, but only until there’s nothing left “in it” for me.
  9. Trust me, but first impressions aren’t necessarily accurate.
  10. Trust me, but only when I feel like telling the truth.

While some will argue that trust can be established quickly, I believe that trust takes time and is built in incremental steps. And like all bell curves, only a small percentage of people, even our most successful business leaders, are genuinely very trustworthy, regardless of how they perceive themselves.

As my friend Bob Vanourek at Triple Crown Leadership likes to say, “Always trust your instincts.” He’s right. They will rarely let you down.

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the Executive Director of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust, and runs the world’s largest membership program for those interested in the subject. She is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and the Executive Editor of TRUST! Magazine. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

Our annual poster, 52 Weeks of Activities to Increase Organizational Trust is available to those who would like to support our work by making a small donation.

Did you know we have published 3 books in our award-winning TRUST Inc. series. They are yours when you join our Alliance.

Copyright 2015, Next Decade, Inc.

 

 

May
24

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

 

What can we learn about building trust from the world’s greatest leaders, teachers, writers and philosophers?

JUST ABOUT EVERYTHING

We recently highlighted the greatest quotes on building trust from:

This week, in honor of our Memorial Day heroes,  we turn our attention to the words (and worlds) of our military leaders.  This article pulls together twenty of their most inspiring quotes. Regardless of your role in life- a parent, teacher, business, religious or military leader, the following quotes contain many messages about character, competence and consistency, the key ingredients for building trust.

  1. “I can better trust those who helped to relieve the gloom of my dark hours than those who are so ready to enjoy with me the sunshine of my prosperity.” Ulysses F. Grant
  2. “I cannot trust a man to control others who cannot control himself.”  Robert E. Lee
  3. “Character as we used to say when I was in elementary school, is what you are. Reputation is what others think you are. The reason that some fail to climb the ladder of success, or of leadership if you want to call it that, is that there is no difference between reputation and character. The two do not always coincide. A man may be considered to have sterling character. Opportunity might come to that man; but if he has the reputation for something he is not, he may fail that opportunity. I think character is the foundation of successful leadership.” General Lucian K. Truscott
  4. “The people when rightly and fully trusted will return the trust.” Abraham Lincoln
  5. “A good battle plan that you act on today can be better than a perfect one tomorrow.” General George S. Patton
  6. “Dependability, integrity, the characteristic of never knowingly doing anything wrong, that you would never cheat anyone, that you would give everybody a fair deal. Character is sort of an all inclusive thing. If a man has character everyone has confidence in him. Soldiers must have confidence in their leader.” General Omar N. Bradley
  7. “Great leaders clarify expectations, roles, and responsibilities. They take action when issues arise, rewarding results, not activity. ” General John E. Michel 
  8. “Leadership is the art of getting someone else to do something you want done because he wants to do it.” Dwight D. Eisenhower
  9. “I would place character as the absolutely number one requirement in leadership. By character, I mean primarily integrity. A man whose superiors and, even more important, whose subordinates can depend upon that leader taking action based on honesty and judgment. If he does not base his action on honor, he is worthless as a leader.” General J. Lawton Collins
  10. “Be courteous to all, but intimate with few; and let those few be well-tried before you give them your confidence.”  George Washington
  11. “I would put character way up on the list. If you want to select an officer for your command you want one who is confident of his abilities, who is loyal and who has good character. It is the man of good character that I am going to seek out. There are a lot of good people who know the ‘smart’ way of getting things done, but they also ride roughshod over people that they are supposed to be working with. I don’t want that.” General Mark Clark
  12. “Leadership is the art of inspiring people to enthusiastically take action toward the achievement of uncommon goals.” Col John R. Boyd, USAF
  13. “There are many qualities that go into a man of sterling character. I don’t know how to break it down. A man of high character has integrity, he is honest, he is reliable, he is straightforward in dealing with people. He is loyal to his family, his friends, his superiors.” General William H. Simpson
  14. “Never tell people how to do things. Tell them what to do and they will surprise you with their ingenuity.”  General George S. Patton
  15. “The moral is to the physical as three to one.” Napoleon Bonaparte
  16.  “No man is justified in doing evil on the ground of expediency.” Theodore Roosevelt
  17. “History shows that weakness is provocative.”  Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld
  18. “I get accused all the time of using the word integrity when I mean character and character when I mean integrity. I think character is everything in leadership. It is what we try to build in all our young officers. It means the truth to me. That’s the only way I can put it. To stand up and tell the truth and not be in the gray areas.” General Jacob Devers
  19. “A true leader has the confidence to stand alone, the courage to make tough decisions, and the compassion to listen to the needs of others. He does not set out to be a leader, but becomes one by the equality of his actions and the integrity of his intent.” Douglas McArthur
  20. “Experts often possess more data than judgment.” Colin Powell

My favorites are #7, #9 and #15. How about yours? 

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the Executive Director of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust, and runs the world’s largest membership program for those interested in the subject. She is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and the Executive Editor of TRUST! Magazine. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

Our annual poster, 52 Weeks of Activities to Increase Organizational Trust is available to those who would like to support our work by making a small donation.

Did you know we have published 3 books in our award-winning TRUST Inc. series. They are yours when you join our Alliance.

Copyright 2015, Next Decade, Inc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

May
19

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

 

There is no doubt a link exists between generosity and trust. One of the great testaments to this can be found in a video produced by a surgeon named Mario Alonso Puig. But many people forget that building trust not only requires reciprocity but also a healthy balance between favors and greed.

In my current work, many of my professional contacts are very generous with their time, as am I. In fact, over the years (trust takes time and is built in incremental steps) we have built reciprocal relationships that are win/win for everyone in this growing circle, and often without the words “trust-building” ever being mentioned.

But as Trust Across America-Trust Around the World’s audience and network has grown, we have fallen victim to what I call the “favor phenomenon”, those “simple requests” usually (but not always) from virtual strangers that flood our daily inbox:

1. Will you endorse my book?

2. Can I be a guest on your radio show?

3. Can you make an introduction to __________?

4. Can you help me raise money?

5. Can you get me a speaking engagement?

6. Will you come to my conference and pay to do so?

7. Will you donate to my charity?

8. Will you follow me on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn?

Can you, will you, can you, will you? One pattern I’ve noticed is these folks, more often than not, have never engaged with us in the past, and may be the same people who claim to be “very busy.” So busy, in fact, that they have no time to build relationships.

Imagine how much faster trust might be built if these “favor askers” lead with trust!

1. I’ve read your book and just wrote an endorsement for you on Amazon.

2. I know of a media opportunity that I believe would be a perfect fit for you.

3. I would like to introduce you to _____________.

4. I want to donate to your cause.

5. I think you would be the perfect speaker at this event.

6. Please be my guest at my conference.

7. I’d like to make a donation to your favorite charity.

8. I follow you on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn and have spent time familiarizing myself with the work you do. Here’s an example of your work that resonates with me.

And by the way, would you mind doing a small favor for me?

So why doesn’t this happen more often? Because most people, in their all-consuming quest to “get” something that provides a short-term benefit ONLY to themselves, also forget (or never learned) that:

  • Leading with trust is essential in every healthy relationship, be it personal or business
  • Trust is reciprocal
  • Trust takes time to build.

It’s quite simple and certainly not rocket science. Try it. The long-term benefits may surprise you.

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the Executive Director of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust, and runs the world’s largest membership program for those interested in the subject. She is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and the Executive Editor of TRUST! Magazine. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

Our annual poster, 52 Weeks of Activities to Increase Organizational Trust is available to those who would like to support our work by making a small donation.

Did you know we have published 3 books in our award-winning TRUST Inc. series. They are yours when you join our Alliance.

Copyright 2015, Next Decade, Inc.

 

 

 

 

May
16

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

 

What can we learn about building trust from the world’s greatest leaders, teachers, writers and philosophers?

JUST ABOUT EVERYTHING

We recently highlighted the greatest quotes on building trust from:

This week we turn our attention to George Bernard Shaw an Irish playwright and founder of the London School of Economics. Did you know that he received both a Nobel Prize in Literature and an Academy Award?  This article pulls together twenty of his most inspiring quotes. Regardless of your role in life- a parent, teacher, business or religious leader, George Bernard Shaw has many messages about character, competence and consistency, the key ingredients for building trust.

 

  1. “Life isn’t about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself.”
  2. “The liar’s punishment is, not in the least that he is not believed, but that he cannot believe anyone else.”
  3. “Never wrestle with pigs. You both get dirty and the pig likes it.”
  4. “Those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything.”
  5. “The most tragic thing in the world is a man of genius who is not a man of honor.”
  6. “Silence is the most perfect expression of scorn.”
  7. “Success does not consist in never making mistakes but in never making the same one a second time.”
  8. “If you have an apple and I have an apple and we exchange these apples then you and I will still each have one apple. But if you have an idea and I have an idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of us will have two ideas.”
  9. “After all, the wrong road always leads somewhere.”
  10. “Better keep yourself clean and bright; you are the window through which you must see the world.”
  11.  “Doing what needs to be done may not make you happy, but it will make you great.”
  12. “Power does not corrupt men; fools, however, if they get into a position of power, corrupt power.”
  13. “When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty.”
  14. “A gentleman is one who puts more into the world than he takes out.”
  15. “Imitation is not just the sincerest form of flattery – it’s the sincerest form of learning.”
  16. “We are made wise not by the recollection of our past, but by the responsibility for our future.”
  17. “Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance.”
  18. “But to admire a strong person and to live under that strong person’s thumb are two different things.”
  19. “The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it.”
  20. “My way of joking is to tell the truth. It’s the funniest joke in the world.”

My favorites are #3, #8 and #19. How about yours? 

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the Executive Director of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust, and runs the world’s largest membership program for those interested in the subject. She is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and the Executive Editor of TRUST! Magazine. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

Our annual poster, 52 Weeks of Activities to Increase Organizational Trust is available to those who would like to support our work by making a small donation.

Did you know we have published 3 books in our award-winning TRUST Inc. series. They are yours when you join our Alliance.

Copyright 2015, Next Decade, Inc.

 

 

 

May
12

 

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

 

Trust & regulation mix like oil and water, yet oil always rises to the top.

The 2015 PWC CEO Survey has just been released, and 78% of CEOs are concerned about over-regulation, and for good reason. Regulation happens to be a trust killer, but that’s not their main cause for concern. Regulation, like low trust slows down the pace of business and innovation. It’s also very costly.

Richard Sexton, PWC’s Vice Chairman of Global Assurance, filmed this short video in which he (attempts to) explain the important role of trust in business, except he misses the mark. To PWC, the route to trust is through (more) reporting. Create more boxes to check and teach companies how to check them and like magic, you’ve got trust!

So let’s recap, CEOs are burdened by increasing regulation and the escape hatch is via more reporting. Except trust CANNOT be regulated and it’s also NOT a check the box finite reporting “project.”

Building organizational trust begins when the CEO, with the support of his or her Board, commits to run a trust-based organization and takes the required steps to do so. But there are certain prerequisites that must be met in order to make this commitment:

  • The C-Suite must acknowledge and embrace the importance of building trust. The business case has been made but it is being ignored by the vast majority of organizations.
  • Building trust is a long-term strategy that may have a short-term negative impact on earnings.
  • Trust as a business strategy requires a certain mindset and “type” of CEO, and a Board that supports this.
  • And perhaps most important, building trust cannot be delegated.

Hiring more compliance staff, increasing regulation and checking more boxes will not build stakeholder trust, regardless of what this survey and others have claimed. PWC may be carving out a “reporting” practice area that will serve it’s internal needs and that of its clients for many years to come, but it’s as much about trust as oil and water.

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the Executive Director of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust, and runs the world’s largest membership program for those interested in the subject. She is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and the Executive Editor of TRUST! Magazine. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

Our annual poster, 52 Weeks of Activities to Increase Organizational Trust is available to those who would like to support our work by making a small donation.

Did you know we have published 3 books in our award-winning TRUST Inc. series. They are yours when you join our Alliance.

Copyright 2015, Next Decade, Inc.

 

May
09

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

 

What can we learn about building trust from the world’s greatest leaders, teachers, writers and philosophers?

JUST ABOUT EVERYTHING

We recently highlighted:

Tomorrow is Mother’s Day so this week we turn our attention to Theodor Seuss Geisel (affectionately known as Dr. Seuss) an American writer and cartoonist. Dr. Seuss published 46 children’s books and for many mothers, including myself, hours were spent reading these books to our children and conveying many life lessons along the way. This article pulls together twenty of his most inspiring quotes. Regardless of your role in life- a parent, teacher, business or religious leader, our beloved Dr. Seuss has a message about character, competency and consistency, the key ingredients for building trust.

If you are a Mom, buy yourself a Dr. Seuss book for Mother’s Day and share it with your kids. It may just be a gift of a lifetime.

 

  1. “Today I shall behave, as if this is the day I will be remembered.”
  2. “It is better to know how to learn than to know.”
  3. “With your head full of brains and your shoes full of feet, you’re too smart to go down any not-so-good street.”
  4. “You will come to a place where the streets are not marked. Some windows are lighted. but mostly they’re darked. A place you could sprain both your elbow and chin! Do you dare to stay out? Do you dare to go in? How much can you lose? How much can you win?”
  5. “Nothing is going to change, unless someone does something soon”
  6. “Sometimes the questions are complicated and the answers are simple.”
  7. “You’ll miss the best things if you keep your eyes shut.”
  8. “I meant what I said and I said what I meant. An elephant’s faithful one-hundred percent!”
  9. “I’m afraid that sometimes you’ll play lonely games too. Games you can’t win ’cause you’ll play against you.”
  10. “Think left and think right and think low and think high. Oh, the thinks you can think up if only you try!”
  11. “Why fit in when you were born to stand out?”
  12. “Only you can control your future.”
  13. “You can get help from teachers, but you are going to have to learn a lot by yourself, sitting alone in a room.”
  14. “I know, up on top you are seeing great sights, but down here at the bottom we, too, should have rights.”
  15. “It’s not about what it is, it’s about what it can become.”
  16. “Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It’s not.”
  17. “Fantasy is a necessary ingredient in living, it’s a way of looking at life through the wrong end of a telescope.”
  18. “ASAP. Whatever that means. It must mean, ‘Act swiftly awesome pacyderm!”
  19. “Oh, the things you can find if you don’t stay behind!”
  20. “You’ll get mixed up, of course, as you already know. You’ll get mixed up with many strange birds as you go. So be sure when you step. Step with care and great tact and remember that Life’s a Great Balancing Act. Just never forget to be dexterous and deft. And never mix up your right foot with your left.”

My favorites are #5, #6 and #20. How about yours? 

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the Executive Director of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust, and runs the world’s largest membership program for those interested in the subject. She is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and the Executive Editor of TRUST! Magazine. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

Our annual poster, 52 Weeks of Activities to Increase Organizational Trust is available to those who would like to support our work by making a small donation.

Did you know we have published 3 books in our award-winning TRUST Inc. series. They are yours when you join our Alliance.

Copyright 2015, Next Decade, Inc.

 

 

May
07

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

 

Did you know that information overload has lowered our attention span to only eight seconds?

Even “Top 10″ lists, a favorite of social media enthusiasts just a few years ago, have now been condensed to “Top 6′s or 5′s” or moved totally away from the written word to short and catchy “feel good” phrases, posters or video sound bytes. Bookstores certainly aren’t thriving, nor are newspapers or magazines. It’s hard to read an article in 8 seconds, let alone a book.

If you want to grab someone’s attention you better be able to do it quickly, or so the PR and marketing folks will tell you. But they just might be wrong, and those “gurus” who choose these “race to the bottom” marketing tactics fuel the chronic low- trust epidemic, instead of playing a much needed role in the solution.

Trust is built in incremental steps and high trust relationships certainly require more than 8 seconds to establish. Short “to do” lists or catchy phrases, just don’t cut it. But ironically, there ARE 6 essential steps we can all take to build the first foundational layer in the “trust construction” process and they CAN be completed in under 8 seconds.

Trash Your Ego: Leave your ego at the door when you meet someone for the first time or attend a meeting. If others think you perceive yourself as better than they are, you might as well not show up at all.

Make Eye Contact: Eye contact is a sign of honesty and reliability. There is a reason why dishonest people are said to have “shifty eyes.”

Shake Like You Mean It: A strong handshake signals confidence in yourself and your abilities, essential components of trust.

Cell Phones be Gone: How often do you check your phone during a meeting? It’s a lack of respect, and more importantly, a clear indication that you are not listening. It takes two to build trust so don’t be distracted.

Smile With Warmth: William Arthur Ward is credited with saying “A warm smile is the universal language of kindness.” And kindness and warmth build trust, as do sincere compliments.

Tell the Truth: Remember, once you lie and get caught, nothing you EVER say will be accepted as the truth.

Gotta run, I’ve gone over the 8 second limit!

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the Executive Director of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust, and runs the world’s largest membership program for those interested in the subject. She is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and the Executive Editor of TRUST! Magazine. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

Our annual poster, 52 Weeks of Activities to Increase Organizational Trust is available to those who would like to support our work by making a small donation.

Did you know we have published 3 books in our award-winning TRUST Inc. series. They are yours when you join our Alliance.

Copyright 2015, Next Decade, Inc.

 

 

 

 

May
05

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

 

Yes, Hillary Clinton is “Dogged by Trust Issues” according to several recent polls including this one reported in Investor’s Daily. Hillary even has her own long-term personal “trustworthiness” graph as published in the Washington Post, and she has called for a restoration of trust among Americans.

Trust, trust and more trust. One would be hard pressed not to agree that “trust” is a central theme in this presidential contestant’s campaign. But should it be?

Emphatically NO! Not in Hillary’s campaign, nor in any other politician’s.

At a minimum starting point, trust requires:

  • Character, competence and consistency. Many politicians, including Hillary, possess the competence component. It’s the other two that are usually lacking.
  • Trust is built over time and in incremental steps. It’s not a campaign platform nor a short-term PR strategy.
  • Finally, there is the question of whether one can separate professional trustworthiness from personal. The answer is a simple “No.” Either one is “holistically” trustworthy or they are not.

Given these foundational prerequisites for trust, there is not a single politician that should ever utter the word “trust”, let alone call for its restoration or use it to get elected.

But the most important reason for politicians to drop the word trust is found in our two-party system where the “trust” prerequisite for presidential candidates does not even exist. Democrats and Republicans alike will vote for who they view as the “best” candidate, regardless of how trustworthy they are, or claim to be. “Best” is defined not by level of trust, but rather by how the voter thinks the candidate will benefit him/her the most, or how big a cut of the pie will come the voter’s way.

So my advice to Hillary and all her opponents would be to drop the word “trust” from all future speeches, articles and campaign platforms and focus on being politicians, what they actually “do” quite well. Be honest about who you are. Leave the word “trust” to those who have a genuine interest and “pure” motive to improve it for the long-term betterment of society.

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the Executive Director of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust, and runs the world’s largest membership program for those interested in the subject. She is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and the Executive Editor of TRUST! Magazine. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

Our annual poster, 52 Weeks of Activities to Increase Organizational Trust is available to those who would like to support our work by making a small donation.

Did you know we have published 3 books in our award-winning TRUST Inc. series. They are yours when you join our Alliance.

Copyright 2015, Next Decade, Inc.

 

 

May
02

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

 

What can we learn about building trust from the world’s greatest leaders, teachers and philosophers? JUST ABOUT EVERYTHING

We recently highlighted:

This week we turn our attention to Mahatma Gandhi, one of the greatest Indian spiritual leaders of all time, and a believer in justice. This article pulls together twenty of his most inspiring quotes. Regardless of your role in life- a parent, teacher, business or religious leader, Mahatma Gandhi has a message about character, competency and consistency, the key ingredients for building trust.

  1. “To believe in something, and not to live it, is dishonest.”
  2. “Truth never damages a cause that is just.”
  3. “The moment there is suspicion about a person’s motives, everything he does becomes tainted.”
  4. “Action expresses priorities.”
  5. “Silence becomes cowardice when occasion demands speaking out the whole truth and acting accordingly.”
  6. “It is wrong and immoral to seek to escape the consequences of one’s acts.”
  7. “Manliness consists not in bluff, bravado or loneliness. It consists in daring to do the right thing and facing consequences whether it is in matters social, political or other. It consists in deeds not words.”
  8. “Honest differences are often a healthy sign of progress.”
  9. “I cannot conceive of a greater loss than the loss of one’s self-respect.”
  10. “Remember that all through history, there have been tyrants and murderers, and for a time, they seem invincible. But in the end, they always fall. Always.”
  11. “The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others.”
  12. “The simplest acts of kindness are by far more powerful then a thousand heads bowing in prayer.”
  13. “In a gentle way, you can shake the world.”
  14. “There is no school equal to a decent home and no teacher equal to a virtuous parent.”
  15. “A ‘No’ uttered from the deepest conviction is better than a ‘Yes’ merely uttered to please, or worse, to avoid trouble.”
  16. “Speak only if it improves upon the silence.”
  17. “It is easier to build a boy than to mend a man.”
  18. “Truth is one, paths are many.”
  19. “Fearlessness is the first requisite of spirituality. Cowards can never be moral.”
  20. “An eye for an eye will only make the whole world blind.”

My favorites are #5, #6 and #14. How about yours? 

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the Executive Director of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust, and runs the world’s largest membership program for those interested in the subject. She is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and the Executive Editor of TRUST! Magazine. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

Our annual poster, 52 Weeks of Activities to Increase Organizational Trust is available to those who would like to support our work by making a small donation.

Did you know we have published 3 books in our award-winning TRUST Inc. series. They are yours when you join our Alliance.

Copyright 2015, Next Decade, Inc.

 

Apr
30

TAA_R2_EDIT-CS3

 

Welcome!

Our monthly roundup is the latest collaborative undertaking of our Trust Alliance, selected blog posts on a variety of organizational trust topics. The subjects are as diverse as the expertise of our members!

By reviewing these posts, you will have a better appreciation for the importance of embracing trust as an organizational imperative.

Let’s get started!

You think you can’t ruin your reputation in 140 characters? Think again. David Penglase explains just how easy it is (all the way from Australia!)

Duke’s Coach K is one of my trust heroes and Randy Conley not only agrees but shares the secrets to trustworthy leadership.

While many will argue that trust should always be extended, Nan Russell provides three reasons why trust is not always the best practice. Agreed!

Have you ever considered how trust acts as a lubricant? Bob Whipple shows us six ways.

It was a close race for the most popular post of “yours truly” this month, but the winner was America’s “Top 10” Most Trustworthy Public Companies announced in the Spring issue of TRUST! Magazine.

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the Executive Director of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust, and runs the world’s largest membership program for those interested in the subject. She is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and the Executive Editor of TRUST! Magazine. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

Our annual poster, 52 Weeks of Activities to Increase Organizational Trust is available to those who would like to support our work by making a small donation.

Did you know we have published 3 books in our award-winning TRUST Inc. series. They are yours when you join our Alliance.

Copyright 2015, Next Decade, Inc.