Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Trust Alliance’

Mar
01

 

Yesterday in a CNBC interview with Jim Cramer, Marc Benioff emphatically stated that “trust is the highest value at Salesforce.” The company’s success is a by-product.

Ten years ago tools to assess and build organizational trust were rare and difficult to locate online. Trust Across America-Trust Around the World was formed, in part, to serve as a clearinghouse for trust tools and related resources.

Like Salesforce.com, most progressive companies are pursuing trust as an intentional business strategy, knowing full well that it is a competitive advantage. Leaders of organizations of any size and shape who are interested in elevating trust and proactively practicing it as a business strategy, may find these website links to be useful. Many of the resources are free.

FREE RESOURCES (Most Popular)

Trust Across America Blog: Viewed 74,898 times in February

TRUST! Magazine: a digital magazine, dedicated to helping leaders and organizations place trust on their strategic agenda. Our current issue has been accessed over 20,000 times.

Case Studies: Our Trustlets are a newly launched and growing library of real-life cases available as free downloads and for use in both academia and business.

Trust Bibliography: Updated annually and curated by Robert Easton, a partner at Accenture, it is probably the most extensive online research tool available (currently 86 pages).

Building Trust Reports: A growing library of “special reports” written by members of our vetted Trust Alliance.

Special Report via our Corporate Integrity Monitor: The Impact of Trust on Financial Returns

Join our Constant Contact mailing list for updates on our progress.

RESOURCES THAT CAN BE PURCHASED

Trust Alliance: a growing group of vetted global professionals working to elevate trust and share resources, now in its 6th year.

Workshops, speaking engagements, etc. Our Alliance members are available to meet just about any trust need an organization might have. No reason to search the internet for the “right” person to fill the gap. Just contact us.

Trust in a Box: A “do it yourself” solution for professionals and organizations interested in elevating trust, ethics and integrity.

Data Licensing: Our proprietary FACTS(R) Framework is the longest ongoing research study of the trustworthiness of America’s 2000 largest US public companies, now in its 8th year. Our data is available for licensing on a case-by-case basis.

Books: An entire Reading Room dedicated to organizational trust.

Top Thought Leaders Program: Nominations are now open for the 9th annual Top Thought Leaders in Trust.

If you lead an organization, serve on a Board or in any management capacity or work with others, and you continue to ignore trust as a hard asset, you are losing out to your competitors. Trust works. Give it a try.

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the CEO and Cofounder of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. A former consultant to McKinsey & Co., she also runs the world’s largest global Trust Alliance and is the editor of the award- winning TRUST INC. book series. In 2017 she was named a Fellow of the Governance & Accountability Institute, and in 2012 she was recognized as one of “25 Women who are Changing the World” by Good Business International. She holds a BA in International Affairs from Lafayette College and an MBA from Baruch at the City University of NY.

Contact me for more information.

Copyright (C) 2018, Next Decade, Inc.

 

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Feb
20

Trust is not a soft skill, nor should it be taken for granted. It is a tangible asset that impacts the bottom line.

Last week’s blog post discussed the various ways that low trust can kill an organization. So how can trust be elevated? We asked our Trust Alliance members to weigh in and the following are some “best practices” for building organizational trust.

  • First identify what builds trust and what breaks trust. Bob Vanourek
  • Agree on core values, then practice and reinforce them daily. Barbara Brooks Kimmel
  • Build cultures of commitment vs. compliance where choices are guided by values, not policies. Mark Fernandes
  • Work tirelessly to dispel the illusion that trust is a soft skill. Doug Conant
  • Be a role model. Charlie Green
  • Be inclusive in your decision-making process. Nadine Hack
  • Set intentional promises and expectations on what you will deliver to all stakeholders. David Reiling
  • Go public when expressing gratitude; go private when expressing disappointment. Holly Latty-Mann
  • Presume good intentions. Bart Alexander
  • In every interaction with every person, ask yourself “What can I do in this moment to strengthen the trust between us?” Jim Kouzes

Our growing global Trust Alliance is working to build tools to help organizations of all sizes and shapes build trust. What’s stopping you from joining?

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the CEO and Cofounder of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. A former consultant to McKinsey & Co., she also runs the world’s largest global Trust Alliance and is the editor of the award- winning TRUST INC. book series. In 2017 she was named a Fellow of the Governance & Accountability Institute, and in 2012 she was recognized as one of “25 Women who are Changing the World” by Good Business International. She holds a BA in International Affairs from Lafayette College and an MBA from Baruch at the City University of NY.

Join our Constant Contact mailing list for updates on our progress.

Copyright 2018 Next Decade, Inc.

 

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Aug
07

Courtesy of mystorybook.com

Far away and just as long ago, in the land of gardens and strip malls, also known as New Jersey, a somewhat smallish “Jersey Girl” named Barbara (Barb to her high school friends) had a rather tall vision to change the world, or at least the conversation.  Barb believed that if she could get people thinking about trust, particularly in business, trust would spring eternal- similar to Jersey blueberries- and take off like a Jersey driver.

And so Barb began to knock softly on the doors of corporate America to politely inquire about trustworthy leaders and their business practices. The responses were far from what she expected to hear.

  • We are big business and don’t budget for soft stuff like trust since it doesn’t impact our bottom line.
  • The corporate credo written on the lobby wall has trust covered.
  • We are already trustworthy. After all, our quarterly earnings are growing and look how fast we are expanding globally.
  • We give to charities and have an annual CSR event.
  • Haven’t you seen our latest TV commercial on diversity?
  • We’re conserving water and energy.
  • We are looking in to cybersecurity.
  • Our compliance department “has trust covered.” We stay just on the “right side” of the law.
  • Who cares if our employees are unhappy? There are plenty to replace them.
  • And the best one, the response from the CEO of a Fortune 500 company… “Trust? Interesting, I never even thought about that word!”

Barb’s quick takeaway…the trust crisis is not the “problem” of big business (until there’s an internal crisis and then lots of money is paid to consultants to make it look like the problem is fixed when it’s not), and one person named Barb from NJ is no threat to big business! Go knock somewhere else until such time as trust is regulated.

And that’s exactly what she did, because Barb had changed her middle name from Jane to “Tenacity” right around her fifth annual 39th birthday. She knocked and knocked and did not give up until the right people started to listen, and even lend a hand. And then the idea struck (sort of like a lightening bolt) – if one rather small woman from NJ could get some “trust loving”, imagine how much 100 men and women, or 1000, or even a million could attract? And so she started a movement, A Campaign for Trust, and she invited everyone who didn’t slam the door to join her (except the mainstream media because they seemed perpetually stuck on bad news that sells)!

In a few months, eyebrows began to raise beyond Jersey’s borders, as did the roster of global Trust Alliance members, men and women from “big business” (the ones who didn’t slam the trust door), small business, startups academia, researchers, community leaders, government and consulting (leadership, culture, teamwork, compliance, ethics, CSR, HR, sales, reputation and crisis repair, communications, risk, data security, governance, sustainability.) They weren’t exactly sure what “signing up” meant, but they trusted Barb enough to know they wanted to be part of this particular movement, because without trust, organizations are at best mediocre, never knowing when the next crisis will strike.

The Trust Alliance has been quite busy over the past four+ years with dozens of projects including:

  1. Roundtable discussions with industry leaders on building trust
  2. Publication of three books in our Trust Inc. series
  3. Introductions between members resulting in speaking engagements, consulting opportunities and new business relationships
  4. An annual trust poster
  5. Publication of a collaborative digital magazine called TRUST!
  6. Assembly of DIY Trust Boxes
  7. Real world case studies called Trustlets

And many more initiatives including two new programs launching this fall. After all, it’s hard to imagine why any organization (even one run by a small, perpetually 39 year old woman from NJ) wouldn’t want to join us and collaboratively help in elevating organizational trust. So what’s holding you back? Feel free to use one of the excuses listed above!

(And by the way, on most days Trust Across America’s website attracts between 500-1000 enlightened visitors who “get” the importance of organizational trust.)

PS- One of Barb’s offspring cautions about trying to be funny about trust. It’s a serious subject. Barb disagrees. She thinks trust can be funny and fun, and serious too! What do you think?

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the CEO and Cofounder of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. She also runs the world’s largest global Trust Alliance and is the editor of the award- winning TRUST INC. book series. In 2017 she was named a Fellow of the Governance & Accountability Institute, and in 2012 she was recognized as one of “25 Women who are Changing the World” by Good Business International. She holds a BA in International Affairs from Lafayette College and an MBA from Baruch at the City University of NY.

For more information visit our website at www.trustacrossamerica.com or contact Barbara Brooks Kimmel, CEO and Cofounder

Barbara@trustacrossamerica.com

Copyright 2017, Next Decade, Inc.

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Feb
18

 

Four years ago Trust Across America formed a Trust Alliance with the mission of uniting a group of global professionals whose work impacts organizational trust. The goal is to work collaboratively to advance thinking, research and programs among the membership that can then be made available to the public.

Our vetted membership is as diverse as the subject of trust itself and includes business leaders, consultants and academics from around the globe with specialties in leadership, culture, teamwork, compliance, ethics, CSR, HR, sales, reputation and crisis repair, communications, risk, data security, governance, sustainability and trust research.

What sort of programs has our Alliance developed?

  1. Roundtable discussions with industry leaders on building trust
  2. Publication of three books in our Trust Inc. series
  3. A monthly collaborative column called Tuning in to Trust and Ethics 
  4. Introductions between members resulting in speaking engagements, consulting opportunities and new business relationships
  5. An annual trust poster
  6. Publication of a collaborative digital magazine called TRUST!
  7. Assembly of DIY Trust Boxes
  8. A series of videos
  9. Short papers on building trust in various industries and functional areas
  10. A free downloadable booklet on building trust in communities

The following are a few of the many testimonials our Alliance members have written:

Since business, life, and leadership are all about relationships, and since healthy relationships are built on trust, what is more important than an Alliance to build trust? Bob Vanourek, former NYSE CEO and co-author “Triple Crown Leadership: Building Excellent, Ethical, and Enduring Organizations.

I mine the content from Trust Across America for inclusion in my periodic all-employee messages. Bruce Anderson, Chief Ethics Officer

The Alliance is laying the groundwork for a spirit of collaboration among trust experts around the world. The tools, resources, and collective knowledge coming together to advance the cause of trustworthy business are making a difference. Randy Conley, The Ken Blanchard Company

Would you like to join us and collaboratively help in advancing organizational trust? All of our members are vetted for suitability and willingness to work with others. Effective March 1, 2017 membership will be “by invitation” only.

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the CEO and Cofounder of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. Barbara also runs the world’s largest global Trust Alliance, is the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and a Managing Member at FACTS® Asset Management, a NJ registered investment advisor. In 2012 was named one of “25 Women who are Changing the World” by Good Business International. Barbara holds a BA in International Affairs and an MBA.

 

 

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Jul
18

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It’s Week #29 of 2016. This latest article is part of a series drawn from our 3rd annual 2016 Trust Poster….now hanging in hundreds of offices around the world. Get yours today!

52 Ideas That You Can Implement to Build Trust

Randy Conley offers this week’s advice. Randy is both a Top Thought Leader in Trust and a member of our Trust Alliance.

Listen with the intent to be influenced.

Listening is one of the most valuable skills a leader can employ to build trust, yet it’s also one of the most under appreciated and least developed leadership competencies.

Most leaders would agree that listening is important and they even understand many of the basics, even if they don’t practice them: don’t interrupt, give the speaker your undivided attention, ask open-ended questions to draw out more information, and paraphrase occasionally to ensure understanding. These are all necessary and valuable skills.

What’s more important, however, is your mindset and attitude about listening. You should listen with the intent of being influenced. Most of us listen with an agenda. We enter a conversation with a preconceived idea of where we want the conversation to go and the desired outcome we’re trying to achieve. That signals to the other party that what they have to say really doesn’t matter much because we’ve already made up our mind about the final decision. That’s demoralizing and erodes trust with the people we lead.

Instead, listen without an agenda. Open yourself to be influenced by what the speaker has to say. Look for opportunities to incorporate their ideas and suggestions into the final outcome. Listening in this way builds trust because it communicates to the speaker that he/she is important and what they have to say is valuable and worthy of consideration. Listening with the intent to be influenced also causes us to speak less, which is the major roadblock to effective listening.

My grandpa was fond of saying that the Lord gave us one mouth and two ears and we should use them in that proportion. Listen with the intent to be influenced and watch trust blossom in your relationships.

Will you choose to implement this valuable advice in your organization this week? If not, ask yourself “why not?”

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the CEO and Cofounder of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. Now in its seventh year, the program’s proprietary FACTS® Framework ranks and measures the trustworthiness of over 2000 US public companies on five quantitative indicators of trustworthy business behavior. Barbara is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and the Executive Editor of TRUST! Magazine.

Copyright 2016, Next Decade, Inc.

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Mar
30

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Organizations and their leaders often find themselves caught in “trust and ethics traps.”

Jes Staley the newly appointed American CEO of the beleaguered British Barclays Bank is one such leader. In fact, as he recently announced in this BBC News Article “I do believe that trust is returning to our institution. But we will never rest, we are never done. We have to focus on building that trust every day.”

Eerily, Staley’s comments have a familiar ring. In the wake of the Libor scandal in 2012 the Bank’s new CEO, an insider named Antony Jenkins also spoke extensively about rebuilding trust. Yet in an all too common response when faced with a crisis of trust and ethics, the Board Chair John McFarlane recently passed blame to regulators for picking on the bank.

We asked our Trust Alliance members to weigh in on the steps Barclays new CEO should take to build trust and ethics, carrying on the legacy of his predecessor.

Leadership Momentum’s Elizabeth Doty emphasizes the importance of building on the company’s new purpose and values, by making clearer, stronger commitments to stakeholders:

Though outsiders can never know a company’s internal reality, Mr. Staley’s comments show that he recognizes that trust is earned by being trustworthy. It is also positive that Mr. Staley’s predecessor, Mr. Jenkins, clarified the company’s purpose and values, and outlined specific behaviors, such as “I honour my commitments.” Still, given the turmoil of repeated leadership changes and reorganization, Mr. Staley and his team are likely to face serious credibility challenges, regardless of their intent.

The purpose of a commitment is to reduce others’ uncertainty, so they feel less risk in trusting us. Making and keeping meaningful commitments is a powerful way to proactively demonstrate trustworthiness. Yet, despite Barclay’s clarification of its purpose and values, stakeholders are still left with their primary uncertainty: How will you make tradeoffs under pressure? “I see nothing to indicate rates and markets will not be rigged again in future or that schemes to enhance bank profits at customers’ expense…could not repeat,” posted one commenter. One solution is to make clearer, stronger commitments specifically related to the side-stepping stakeholders worry about. For example, Barclay’s could commit to doing whatever most contributes to a customer’s goals, or to a level playing field in the market. Though it takes courage, companies that put such a stake in the ground and learn how to deliver a) increase credibility by showing they understand stakeholders’ true risks, b) reduce the potential for mixed messages to staff, c) force themselves to innovate, and d) differentiate themselves in a way that is extremely difficult to emulate. The key will be not to underestimate the challenges of re-shaping their culture to get there.

Davia Temin, a leading reputation and crisis response consultant speaks of the trust challenges continuing to plague most of the largest global financial institutions years after the 2008 financial meltdown.

Rebuilding trust in financial institutions is a complex algorithm that can test the skills of the best financial engineering “rocket scientist.”  

Far from simply making a pronouncement of one’s intent (although that can be the first step), the organization needs to first deconstruct all the elements that went into building trust in their particular firm in the first place, analyze all the things that went wrong, and then construct a plan to overcorrect the breaches. Because simply fixing them will not rebuild trust, it will only, maybe, stop the erosion. 

But this is seriously hard work. Barclays, as most banks, has a number of critical audiences, each of whom needs a different set of fixes in order to begin to restore their trust. And some of those fixes are in direct conflict with others. Individual customers, shareholders, institutional clients, counterparties, regulators and legislators in every country in which they operate, and even the public at large must each feel that the bank puts THEIR INTERESTS in front of its own. Because it has been the self-dealing aspect of financial institutions’ behavior that did the most damage to their reputations and caused the greatest loss of trust.   

So, to rebuild trust, Barclays and others will need to show their audiences that the bank puts them first…and that’s a hard thing to do and remain profitable. But it is almost impossible to make such a promise and then ignore it, or to fail in its announced attempt. So, now that Mr. Staley has thrown down the gauntlet, perhaps he can get his financial product rocket scientists to reverse-engineer all the elements that went into the losing of public trust, share them with us all, and then announce how he will redress them, one by one. That, indeed, just might work, and would be my prescription.”

And finally Bob Whipple of Leadergrow reminds us where trust starts in all institutions.

It sounds like a lot of problems have been swept under the rug for some time and are impacting all facets of Barclays. I applaud the resolve to rebuild trust in the bank and the candor at admitting the many unpopular steps it will take.  My advice is to recognize that rebuilding a culture starts at the top and works its way down the organization.  Establish an understanding that it is safe for people to tell you the things that are hard to say. Do not punish people when they bring up issues that are uncomfortable or difficult to address.    

Similar to Barclays many organizations find themselves in trust traps because they hold on to the notion that trust and ethics are “soft skills.”

And because trust is ignored or taken for granted, its decline continues across all major institutions. Some of the warning signs of low trust include:

  • Disengaged boards with minimal diversity- not only must the board be “on board” with the mission and vision of the organization but research, including our own points to a correlation between high trust organizations and gender diversity.
  • Frequent crises- identifying core values, practicing and reinforcing them daily heads off many “would be” crises. Leaders who view trust as “soft” often find themselves spending the majority of their time putting out fires instead of improving their culture.
  • Short-term profit maximization at all costs including layoffs and job cuts as a first line of defense- it’s not unusual for companies like Barclays to think the bleeding can be stopped by cutting jobs and divisions, but these are simply bandages and they never cure diseases.
  • Decreasing CEO tenure and increasing compensation packages tied to quarterly earnings- try tying CEO compensation to some point in the future (3-5 years) and suddenly the focus changes from the short to the long term.
  • Increasing regulation (and scrutiny from regulators) and larger legal and compliance departments- as we have discussed in the past, trust simply can’t be regulated. It’s voluntary.

Fortunately the most progressive organizations have begun to recognize the strategic advantages of a high trust culture.

  • Fewer crises and the ability to recover more rapidly
  • A large trust “bank account”
  • Faster decision making and improved execution
  • Higher employee engagement
  • Higher customer loyalty and retention
  • Greater innovation (high trust fuels high innovation, not the other way around)
  • Increased long-term profitability

The trust and ethics crisis at Barclays will not end until insiders, beginning at the Board level, not only accept blame and take responsibility, but also put actionable measures in place to clean up the culture. Will Jes Staley be the CEO who turns Barclays around? Will he walk the trust he is talking? What do you think?

Tuning in to Trust & Ethics is a new monthly column of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World’s Trust Alliance compiled by Barbara Brooks Kimmel

Another version of this article first appeared on the FCPA Blog.

Part I: bit.ly/1Mp9LO7

Part II: bit.ly/1UcHiTJ

Copyright (c)  2016 Next Decade, Inc.

 

 

 

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Mar
28

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It’s Week #13 of 2016. This latest article is part of a series drawn from our 3rd annual 2016 Trust Poster….now hanging in hundreds of offices around the world. Get yours today!

52 Ideas That You Can Implement to Build Trust

David Penglase, a Trust Alliance member from Australia offers the following:

“In earning the trust of others, being clear on what you want for others, is more important than what you want from them.”

Your intentions matter! Not just what you intend to do (the action), and not just why you intend to do it (the motivation behind the action), but also having a clear and mindful understanding of how what you intend to do will impact others (the impact).

These three elements of intention, the action (what), the motivation (why), and the impact (how), are a direct reflection of your character (who). 

You now have the who, what, why and how of intention, all that remains is for you to decide on when you will start to build even more trust in your life (self-trust, trust in others and earning the trust of others) by harnessing the power of intention.

Thank you David. We hope our readers heed this week’s advice.

 

 

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the CEO and Cofounder of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. Now in its sixth year, the program’s proprietary FACTS® Framework ranks and measures the trustworthiness of over 2000 US public companies on five quantitative indicators of trustworthy business behavior. Barbara is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and the Executive Editor of TRUST! Magazine.

Copyright 2016, Next Decade, Inc.

 

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Mar
07

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It’s Week #10 of 2016. This latest article is part of a series drawn from our 3rd annual 2016 Trust Poster….now hanging in hundreds of offices around the world. Get yours today!

52 Ideas That You Can Implement to Build Trust

Carol Sanford, one of our 2016 Top Thought Leaders in Trust, a Lifetime Achievement Award winner, and a member of the Trust Alliance offers this:

“Trust comes from fostering personal agency in others, that is the drive to contribute, not always be the one who leads the way.” 

A natural human propensity to contribute exists in all of us. Research reaffirms it now. It is often called Personal Agency. i.e. Taking up action to change something, especially on a significant level. People don’t always act on this inclination. Sometimes it is as a result of a low confidence in their ability to control unexpected challenges and low certainty they can produce outcomes. To have personal agency we have to activate our own Will to act and manage ourselves to figure our way through challenges. In other words, we first have to trust ourselves to be able to act and achieve.

Those in our lives who encourage and build this capability in us come to be the ones we trust. They are not “in it” only for themselves, but mentoring and developing others into managing their own path to significant contribution. It is how trust bonds are built, with everyone from children, to students and employees, to customers. The magic sauce is building others agency to make that difference and doing it again and again to build a “trust muscle, so to speak.”

Thank you Carol. We hope our readers heed your advice.

It’s not too late to catch up on our weekly series…..

Week #1 Kouzes & Posner 

Week #2 Bob Vanourek

Week #3 Barbara Kimmel

Week #4 Mark Fernandes

Week #5 Doug Conant

Week #6 Roger Steare

Week #7 Nan Russell

Week #8 Stephen M.R. Covey

Week #9 Bill George

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the CEO and Cofounder of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust. Now in its sixth year, the program’s proprietary FACTS® Framework ranks and measures the trustworthiness of over 2000 US public companies on five quantitative indicators of trustworthy business behavior. Barbara is also the editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and the Executive Editor of TRUST! Magazine.

Copyright 2016, Next Decade, Inc.

 

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Feb
22

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It’s Week #8 of 2016. This is our latest article in a series of  ideas to elevate trust in your organization, drawn from our 3rd annual 2016 Trust Poster….now hanging in hundreds of offices around the world. Get yours today!

52 Ideas That You Can Implement to Build Trust

Stephen M.R. Covey a Trust Alliance Member and one of our 2016 Top Thought Leaders in Trust, and a Lifetime Achievement Award winner offers this:

“The first job of a leader is to inspire trust; the second job is to extend trust.”

As leaders, we inspire trust through our credibility—our character and our competence—and through our behavior—how we do what we do. While I believe that most leaders today recognize the need to inspire trust by modeling it through who they are and what they can do, I’m not sure that most recognize the equally vital need to extend trust to others. And that’s where I think we’re got to put special focus in our leadership work—leading out in extending trust to others.

Indeed, I believe that the defining skill that transforms a manager into a leader is the extending of trust. And the extension of trust generates reciprocity: when we give it, people receive it, and they return it. When we withhold it, they withhold it. As Abraham Lincoln put it in the affirmative: “The people, when rightly and fully trusted, will return the trust.” And Lao Tzu expressed the other side: “He who does not trust enough will not be trusted. No trust given, none received. Mistrust begets mistrust.”

In my work in over 40 countries over the past few years, I have found this common pattern in lower-trust organizations: the primary reason why employees don’t trust their management in lower-trust companies is first and foremost because the management doesn’t trust the employees—and the employees reciprocate that distrust right back at them. The same thing can happen with partners, and even with customers. If you don’t trust them, they’ll tend to not trust you.

But, thankfully, it works the other direction as well. When we extend trust to others, people receive it, and they return it. They’re inspired by it. They rise to the occasion. They perform better. They want to prove the trust justified. There is a genuine reciprocity of trust. Yes, a few may abuse the trust but the vast majority will be inspired by it. Don’t penalize the many because of the few. Don’t let the 5% of the people you can’t trust define for you the 95% who you can. Far better to build your culture around the 95% who you can trust and let that culture crowd out, weed out, starve out the 5% who you can’t. Some are afraid of extending trust out of fear that they might lose control. But think about it: at the end of the day, there is actually more control in a high-trust culture than there is in a rules-based culture because you can’t come up with enough rules for people who you can’t trust. The French sociologist Emile Dirkheim put it this way: “When mores [cultural values] are sufficient, laws are unnecessary; when mores are insufficient, laws are unenforceable.”

In my judgment, the very act of extending trust is the defining act of leadership. And it’s the leaders job to go first. Someone needs to go first; that’s what leaders do—leaders go first. Yes, there’s a risk in trusting people. But there’s also a risk in not trusting people. And I’m going to submit that in today’s collaborative, interdependent, knowledge-worker world, not trusting people is more often the greater risk. Now I’m not suggesting that we extend trust blindly or naively, without clear expectations or accountability—that’s not smart. But I am suggesting that we lead out with a decided propensity to trust—to extend trust wisely (what I refer to as “smart trust”).

The reality is that we need more willingness to extend trust in our world today, not less. Unfortunately, it’s not uncommon to have two trustworthy people working together—and no trust—when neither person is willing to extend it to the other.

That’s why I reiterate: the first job of a leader is to inspire trust; the second job is to extend it.

Extending trust not only transforms a manager into a leader, it is a game-changer—both for the leader extending the trust and for the person being trusted. Indeed, to be trusted is the most inspiring and compelling form of human motivation.

People today don’t want to be managed; they want to be led. Millenials don’t want to be managed; they want to be led. They want to be inspired. The reality is that we manage things (which have no agency or choice) but we lead people (who do have agency and choice).   We should strive to be efficient with things and effective with people. But too often, too many of us treat people like things and attempt to manage them, be efficient with them, and withhold trust from them. That doesn’t inspire. What does inspire is to lead out in extending trust to others.

In the beautiful words of Dr. Albert Schweitzer, “In everybody’s life, at some time, our inner fire goes out. It is then burst into flame by an encounter with another human being. We should all be thankful to those people who rekindle the inner spirit.”

When we extend trust to another person, we rekindle the inner spirit—both theirs, and ours, and in so doing, we can also produce an extraordinary dividend: what I call “the speed of trust.”

Thank you Stephen. We hope our readers heed your advice.

It’s not too late to catch up on our weekly series…..

Week #1 Kouzes & Posner 

Week #2 Bob Vanourek

Week #3 Barbara Kimmel

Week #4 Mark Fernandes

Week #5 Doug Conant

Week #6 Roger Steare

Week #7 Nan Russell

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the CEO & Cofounder of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help organizations build trust and integrity. She facilitates the world’s largest membership program for those interested in the subject. Barbara also serves as editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and the Executive Editor of TRUST! Magazine. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

Copyright 2016, Next Decade, Inc.

 

 

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Feb
05

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Have you ever seen Trusted Advisor Associates Trust Equation? I’ve pulled it directly from their website with permission from Charles H. Green, a Trust Alliance member and one of our Lifetime Achievement Award Winners.

The Trust Equation uses four objective variables to measure trustworthiness. These four variables are best described as: Credibility, Reliability, Intimacy and Self-Orientation.

We combine these variables into the following equation:

TQ stands for Trust Quotient. The Trust Quotient is a number — like your IQ or EQ — that benchmarks your trustworthiness against the four variables.

In my opinion, and maybe Charlie’s too, nothing busts trust faster than a high denominator. All the credibility, reliability and intimacy in the world can’t fix that all too frequent “out of control” self-orientation.

Whether your work is in consulting, sales or any other profession requiring people skills, consider the possibility that the other individuals sitting at the table are familiar with Charlie’s Trust Equation. They are seeking signs of high self-orientation and it may just be the personality trait that kills the deal. Here’s ten signs to look for:

  1. Focus on the “I” instead of the “We”
  2. Failure to ask (or ask for) questions
  3. Interrupting
  4. Talking more than listening
  5. Lack of transparency
  6. Need for recognition
  7. Taking all the credit
  8. Having a win/lose perspective as opposed to a win/win
  9. Bending the truth
  10. Making excuses

It’s never too late to lower your self-orientation if it’s impeding your ability to succeed. What do you think?

Barbara Brooks Kimmel is the CEO & Cofounder of Trust Across America-Trust Around the World whose mission is to help responsible organizations build trust. She facilitates the world’s largest membership program for those interested in the subject. Barbara also serves as editor of the award winning TRUST INC. book series and the Executive Editor of TRUST! Magazine. In 2012 Barbara was named “One of 25 Women Changing the World” by Good Business International.

Copyright 2016, Next Decade, Inc.

 

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